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Freedom's Journey : African American Voices of the Civil War

By: Yacovone, Donald.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The Library of Black America series: Publisher: Chicago : Chicago Review Press, 2004Description: 1 online resource (609 p.).ISBN: 9781569769935.Subject(s): African American political activists - Biography | African American political activists -- Biography | African American soldiers - Biography | African American soldiers -- Biography | African Americans - Biography | African Americans -- Biography | Slaves - United States - Biography | Slaves -- United States -- Biography | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - African Americans | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- African Americans | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narrativesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Freedom's Journey : African American Voices of the Civil WarDDC classification: 973.708996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Copyright; Contents; Abbreviations; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I: Freedom's Battlefield; Part II: Memory's Battlefield; Selected Reading List; Index
Summary: The men and women represented in this book had the extraordinary opportunity of witnessing the end of a 200-year struggle for freedom: the Civil War. Gathered here are the stirring testimonies of many African Americans including slaves who endured their last years of servitude before escaping from their masters, soldiers who fought for the freedom of their brethren and for equal rights, and reporters who covered the defeat of their oppressors. These African American voices include the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass on the meaning of the war; Martin R. Delany on his meeting with Lin
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E540.N3 F73 2004 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=683860 Available EBL683860

Cover; Copyright; Contents; Abbreviations; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I: Freedom's Battlefield; Part II: Memory's Battlefield; Selected Reading List; Index

The men and women represented in this book had the extraordinary opportunity of witnessing the end of a 200-year struggle for freedom: the Civil War. Gathered here are the stirring testimonies of many African Americans including slaves who endured their last years of servitude before escaping from their masters, soldiers who fought for the freedom of their brethren and for equal rights, and reporters who covered the defeat of their oppressors. These African American voices include the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass on the meaning of the war; Martin R. Delany on his meeting with Lin

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The responses of African Americans to the Civil War and emancipation are the focus of much of today's best US history scholarship. This well-conceived and creatively and thoroughly edited anthology presents both familiar and relatively obscure voices that document the emancipation process and its meaning from the perspective of free blacks and former bondsmen. Yacovone (Massachusetts Historical Society) arranges the 57 texts in two parts: "Freedom's Battlefield" and "Memory's Battlefield." He includes the speeches and writings of such well-known blacks as Frederick Douglass, Martin R. Delany, Henry Highland Garnet, Charlotte Forten Grimke, and Elizabeth Keckley. Other spokesmen and women--less familiar, perhaps, but no less persuasive and powerful in condemning slavery and racism--include James McCune Smith, J.W.C. Pennington, Susie King Taylor, and Elijah P. Marrs. These voices and others document the heterogeneous attitudes of African Americans toward abolition; colonization; racial violence; the mobilization of and discrimination against black soldiers; emancipation; and Abraham Lincoln's assassination. In keeping with the best recent scholarship, Yacovone frames the postwar writings of former slaves and black soldiers within the context of historical remembering and forgetting. A sophisticated and invaluable collection. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All college and university collections at all levels. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Donald Yacovone is the senior associate editor at the Massachusetts Historical Society and editor of the Massachusetts Historical Review. His books include a collection of essays on the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and an edition of the Civil War letters of George E. Stephens. He also helped edit the Black Abolitionist Papers. He lives in Medford, Massachusetts.

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