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Modern Irish and Scottish Poetry.

By: Mackay, Peter.
Contributor(s): Longley, Edna | Brearton, Fran.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (348 p.).ISBN: 9781139082358.Subject(s): English poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | English poetry -- Irish authors -- History and criticism | English poetry -- Scottish authors -- History and criticism | Rhymers' Club (London, England) | Rhymers’ Club (London, England)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Modern Irish and Scottish PoetryDDC classification: 821.9109 | 821/.914099411 LOC classification: PR8771 .M62 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1 Swordsmen: W. B. Yeats and Hugh MacDiarmid; Chapter 2 Tradition and the individual editor: Professor Grierson, modernism and national poetics; Chapter 3 Louis MacNeice among the islands; Chapter 4 Townland, desert, cave: Irish and Scottish Second World War poetry; Chapter 5 Affinities in time and space: reading the Gaelic poetry of Ireland and Scotland; Chapter 6 Contemporary affinities; Chapter 7 The Classics in modern Scottish and Irish poetry
Chapter 8 Translating Beowulf: Edwin Morgan and Seamus HeaneyChapter 9 Reading in the gutters; Chapter 10 'What matters is the yeast': 'foreignising' Gaelic poetry; Chapter 11 Outside English: Irish and Scottish poets in the East; Chapter 12 Names for nameless things: the poetics of place names; Chapter 13 Desire lines: mapping the city in contemporary Belfast and Glasgow poetry; Chapter 14 'The ugly burds without wings'?: reactions to tradition since the 1960s; Chapter 15 'And cannot say / and cannot say': Richard Price, Randolph Healy and the dialogue of the deaf
Chapter 16 On 'The Friendship of Young Poets': Douglas Dunn, Michael Longley and Derek MahonChapter 17 'No misprints in this work': the poetic 'translations' of Medbh McGuckian and Frank Kuppner; Chapter 18 Phoenix or dead crow? Irish and Scottish poetry magazines, 1945-2000; Chapter 19 Outwith the Pale: Irish-Scottish studies as an act of translation; Guide to further reading; Index
Summary: This collection of new essays offers the first sustained comparative reading of modern Irish and Scottish poetry.
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Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1 Swordsmen: W. B. Yeats and Hugh MacDiarmid; Chapter 2 Tradition and the individual editor: Professor Grierson, modernism and national poetics; Chapter 3 Louis MacNeice among the islands; Chapter 4 Townland, desert, cave: Irish and Scottish Second World War poetry; Chapter 5 Affinities in time and space: reading the Gaelic poetry of Ireland and Scotland; Chapter 6 Contemporary affinities; Chapter 7 The Classics in modern Scottish and Irish poetry

Chapter 8 Translating Beowulf: Edwin Morgan and Seamus HeaneyChapter 9 Reading in the gutters; Chapter 10 'What matters is the yeast': 'foreignising' Gaelic poetry; Chapter 11 Outside English: Irish and Scottish poets in the East; Chapter 12 Names for nameless things: the poetics of place names; Chapter 13 Desire lines: mapping the city in contemporary Belfast and Glasgow poetry; Chapter 14 'The ugly burds without wings'?: reactions to tradition since the 1960s; Chapter 15 'And cannot say / and cannot say': Richard Price, Randolph Healy and the dialogue of the deaf

Chapter 16 On 'The Friendship of Young Poets': Douglas Dunn, Michael Longley and Derek MahonChapter 17 'No misprints in this work': the poetic 'translations' of Medbh McGuckian and Frank Kuppner; Chapter 18 Phoenix or dead crow? Irish and Scottish poetry magazines, 1945-2000; Chapter 19 Outwith the Pale: Irish-Scottish studies as an act of translation; Guide to further reading; Index

This collection of new essays offers the first sustained comparative reading of modern Irish and Scottish poetry.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Mackay (Trinity College Dublin), Longley (Queen's Univ.), and Brearton (Queen's Univ.) provide a collection that explores modern Irish and Scottish poetry from an "archipelagic" point of view; that is, the essays reconceive modern poetry from the British Isles by emphasizing the polycentric, multileveled aspects of the modern literary and cultural field. By offering readings of modern poetry that examine the poetic traffic that crisscrosses these islands, the contributors--scholars and poets--challenge the nation-based paradigm that has dominated the study of modern poetry in particular and literary studies in general. The essays examine several Irish and Scottish poets, including W. B. Yeats, Hugh MacDiarmid, Louis MacNiece, Douglas Dunn, Michael Longley, Richard Price, Randolph Healy, Medbh McGuckian, Frank Kuppner, Edwin Morgan, and Seamus Heaney. This expansive and polycentric perspective proves to be a major shift in the direction of literary studies; this excellent collection will be an important source for a new reading of modern Anglophone poetry. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. S. Baggett Lander University

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