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The Deaths of Others : The Fate of Civilians in America's Wars

By: Tirman, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2011Description: 1 online resource (417 p.).ISBN: 9780199700998.Subject(s): Battle casualties | Civilians in war | Militarism --United States | United States --Foreign public opinion | United States --History, Military --20th century | United States --History, Military --21st century | United States --Military policy | War and society --United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Deaths of Others : The Fate of Civilians in America's WarsDDC classification: 355.00973 LOC classification: E840.4.T57 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; 1. Introduction: Death and Remembrance in American Wars; 2. American Wars and the Culture of Violence; 3. Strategic Bombing in the Second World War; 4. The Korean War: The Hegemony of Forgetting; 5. The Vietnam War: The High Cost of Credibility; 6. The Reagan Doctrine: Savage War by Proxy; 7. Iraq: The Twenty Years' War; 8. Afghanistan: Hot Pursuit on Terrorism's Frontier; 9. Three Atrocities and the Rules of Engagement; 10. Counting: A Single Death Is a Tragedy, a Million Deaths Are a Statistic; 11. The Epistemology of War; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: Americans are greatly concerned about the number of our troops killed in battle--100,000 dead in World War I; 300,000 in World War II; 33,000 in the Korean War; 58,000 in Vietnam; 4,500 in Iraq; over 1,000 in Afghanistan--and rightly so. But why are we so indifferent, often oblivious, to the far greater number of casualties suffered by those we fight and those we fight for? This is the compelling, largely unasked question John Tirman answers in The Deaths of Others. Between six and seven million people died in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq alone, the majority of them civilians. And yet Americans de
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E840.4.T57 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=694057 Available EBL694057

Cover; Contents; 1. Introduction: Death and Remembrance in American Wars; 2. American Wars and the Culture of Violence; 3. Strategic Bombing in the Second World War; 4. The Korean War: The Hegemony of Forgetting; 5. The Vietnam War: The High Cost of Credibility; 6. The Reagan Doctrine: Savage War by Proxy; 7. Iraq: The Twenty Years' War; 8. Afghanistan: Hot Pursuit on Terrorism's Frontier; 9. Three Atrocities and the Rules of Engagement; 10. Counting: A Single Death Is a Tragedy, a Million Deaths Are a Statistic; 11. The Epistemology of War; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

Americans are greatly concerned about the number of our troops killed in battle--100,000 dead in World War I; 300,000 in World War II; 33,000 in the Korean War; 58,000 in Vietnam; 4,500 in Iraq; over 1,000 in Afghanistan--and rightly so. But why are we so indifferent, often oblivious, to the far greater number of casualties suffered by those we fight and those we fight for? This is the compelling, largely unasked question John Tirman answers in The Deaths of Others. Between six and seven million people died in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq alone, the majority of them civilians. And yet Americans de

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Tirman currently serves as a trustee of International Alert, a major conflict-prevention NGO in London. He is the author of "Spoils of War: The Human Cost of America's Arms Trade". <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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