Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Platonopolis : Platonic Political Philosophy in Late Antiquity

By: O'Meara, Dominic J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (262 p.).ISBN: 9780191531521.Subject(s): Platonists | Political science -- Philosophy | Political scienceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Platonopolis : Platonic Political Philosophy in Late AntiquityDDC classification: 320.01 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION; PART I. NEOPLATONIC POLITICAL THEORY RECONSTRUCTED: THE DIVINIZATION OF SOUL; PART II. NEOPLATONIC POLITICAL THEORY RECONSTRUCTED: THE DIVINIZATION OF THE STATE; PART III. PLATONOPOLIS IN CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index of Names and Subjects; Index of Passages
Summary: Conventional wisdom suggests that the Platonist philosophers of Late Antiquity, from Plotinus (third century) to the sixth-century schools in Athens and Alexandria, neglected the political dimension of their Platonic heritage in their concentration on an otherworldly life. Dominic O'Meara presents a revelatory reappraisal of these thinkers, arguing that their otherworldliness involved rather than excluded political ideas, and he proposes for the first time a reconstruction of theirpolitical philosophy, their conception of the function, structure, and contents of political science, and its rela
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
B517 .O642 2003 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=728968 Available EBL728968

Contents; Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION; PART I. NEOPLATONIC POLITICAL THEORY RECONSTRUCTED: THE DIVINIZATION OF SOUL; PART II. NEOPLATONIC POLITICAL THEORY RECONSTRUCTED: THE DIVINIZATION OF THE STATE; PART III. PLATONOPOLIS IN CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index of Names and Subjects; Index of Passages

Conventional wisdom suggests that the Platonist philosophers of Late Antiquity, from Plotinus (third century) to the sixth-century schools in Athens and Alexandria, neglected the political dimension of their Platonic heritage in their concentration on an otherworldly life. Dominic O'Meara presents a revelatory reappraisal of these thinkers, arguing that their otherworldliness involved rather than excluded political ideas, and he proposes for the first time a reconstruction of theirpolitical philosophy, their conception of the function, structure, and contents of political science, and its rela

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

O'Meara (Univ. of Fribourg, Switzerland) convincingly challenges the standard picture of Platonists (from Plotinus to Damascius) in late antiquity as completely focused on speculative metaphysics and internal spirituality. Employing Plato's cave allegory as a schema, he correlates the substantial amount of Neoplatonic discussion of practical ethics and political themes with the philosopher's ascent out of and descent into the cave of ordinary human experience. Cultivating the ethical virtues is a lesser, practical good, but it is necessary training for anyone who aspires to attain transcendent wisdom. Similarly, divinization--the mystical goal of Neoplatonists--should not be construed as individualistic self-absorption but rather as unification with impersonal goodness, which necessarily inclines to express its own nature in the world, beginning with the sage's guidance of his pupils. O'Meara skillfully tracks the persistence in later Platonists of themes in Plato's Laws, namely, the philosopher as lawgiver and the social function of religion. Especially interesting are discussions of the Emperor Julian's application of Iamblichus' philosophy. Part 3 examines this Platonic heritage in Christian political philosophy and ecclesiastical theory (Eusebius, Augustine, and pseudo-Dionysius) and Islam (al-Farabi). O'Meara combines scholarly rigor with admirably clear argument. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. Bussanich University of New Mexico

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.