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Soft News Goes to War : Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy in the New Media Age

By: Baum, Matthew A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (368 p.).ISBN: 9781400841288.Subject(s): Magazine format television programs -- United States | Television broadcasting of news -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- Public opinionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Soft News Goes to War : Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy in the New Media AgeDDC classification: 070.1 | 070.1/95 LOC classification: PN4888 .T4 B34 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Chapter One: War and Entertainment; Chapter Two: Soft News and the Accidentally Attentive Public; Chapter Three: "I Heard It on Oprah"; Chapter Four: Bringing War to the Masses; Chapter Five: Tuning Out the World Isn't as Easy as It Used to Be; Chapter Six: Rallying Round the Water Cooler; Chapter Seven: Soft News and World Views: Foreign Policy Attitudes of the Inattentive Public; Chapter Eight: Soft News, Public Opinion, and American Foreign Policy: The Good, the Bad, and the Merely Entertaining; Notes; References; Index
Summary: The American public has consistently declared itself less concerned with foreign affairs in the post-Cold War era, even after 9/11, than at any time since World War II. How can it be, then, that public attentiveness to U.S. foreign policy crises has increased? This book represents the first systematic attempt to explain this apparent paradox. Matthew Baum argues that the answer lies in changes to television's presentation of political information. In so doing he develops a compelling ""byproduct"" theory of information consumption. The information revolution has fundamentally changed the wa
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PN4888 .T4 B34 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=784520 Available EBL784520

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Chapter One: War and Entertainment; Chapter Two: Soft News and the Accidentally Attentive Public; Chapter Three: "I Heard It on Oprah"; Chapter Four: Bringing War to the Masses; Chapter Five: Tuning Out the World Isn't as Easy as It Used to Be; Chapter Six: Rallying Round the Water Cooler; Chapter Seven: Soft News and World Views: Foreign Policy Attitudes of the Inattentive Public; Chapter Eight: Soft News, Public Opinion, and American Foreign Policy: The Good, the Bad, and the Merely Entertaining; Notes; References; Index

The American public has consistently declared itself less concerned with foreign affairs in the post-Cold War era, even after 9/11, than at any time since World War II. How can it be, then, that public attentiveness to U.S. foreign policy crises has increased? This book represents the first systematic attempt to explain this apparent paradox. Matthew Baum argues that the answer lies in changes to television's presentation of political information. In so doing he develops a compelling ""byproduct"" theory of information consumption. The information revolution has fundamentally changed the wa

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Baum (political science and communication, UCLA) explores the ways in which many people receive news information on foreign policy matters. He makes the compelling case that talk shows and other nontraditional sources are significant channels for this "news"--a notion he capsulizes in one of his chapter titles: "I Heard It on Oprah." The viewers of such broadcasting usually pay less attention to traditional sources. Because foreign conflicts are often talk-show fodder, viewers of these programs often receive information that they might otherwise ignore. However, the accuracy--and the value--and of that information may leave much to be desired. Baum marshals an impressive body of research data to support his thesis, and he arranges it in a highly readable manner. He supplements his excellent presentation with substantive endnotes and at least one appendix for each chapter. The work is fully annotated with an extensive reference list and a name and subject index. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. P. E. Kane emeritus, SUNY College at Brockport

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Matthew A. Baum is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Communications at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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