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Roosevelt's Lost Alliances : How Personal Politics Helped Start the Cold War

By: Costigliola, Frank.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (545 p.).ISBN: 9781400839520.Subject(s): Cold war -- Diplomatic history | Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1933-1945Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Roosevelt's Lost Alliances : How Personal Politics Helped Start the Cold WarDDC classification: 940.5322 LOC classification: D748Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Key Players; Introduction; Chapter 1: A Portrait of the Allies as Young Men: Franklin, Winston, and Koba; Chapter 2 From Missy to Molotov: The Women and Men Who Sustained the Big Three; Chapter 3 The Personal Touch: Forming the Alliance, January-August 1941; Chapter 4 Transcending Differences: Eden Goes to Moscow and Churchill to Washington, December 1941; Chapter 5 Creating the "Family Circle": The Tortuous Path to Tehran, 1942-43; Chapter 6 "I've Worked It Out": Roosevelt's Plan to Win the Peace and Defy Death, 1944-45
Chapter 7 The Diplomacy of Trauma: Kennan and His Colleagues in Moscow, 1933-46Chapter 8 Guns and Kisses in the Kremlin: Ambassadors Harriman and Clark Kerr Encounter Stalin, 1943-46; Chapter 9 "Roosevelt's Death Has Changed Everything": Truman's First Days, April-June 1945; Chapter 10 The Lost Alliance: Widespread Anxiety and Deepening Ideology, July 1945-March 1946; Conclusion and Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Bibliographical Note; Notes; Index
Summary: In the spring of 1945, as the Allied victory in Europe was approaching, the shape of the postwar world hinged on the personal politics and flawed personalities of Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances captures this moment and shows how FDR crafted a winning coalition by overcoming the different habits, upbringings, sympathies, and past experiences of the three leaders. In particular, Roosevelt trained his famous charm on Stalin, lavishing respect on him, salving his insecurities, and rendering him more amenable to compromise on some matters. Yet, even as
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Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Key Players; Introduction; Chapter 1: A Portrait of the Allies as Young Men: Franklin, Winston, and Koba; Chapter 2 From Missy to Molotov: The Women and Men Who Sustained the Big Three; Chapter 3 The Personal Touch: Forming the Alliance, January-August 1941; Chapter 4 Transcending Differences: Eden Goes to Moscow and Churchill to Washington, December 1941; Chapter 5 Creating the "Family Circle": The Tortuous Path to Tehran, 1942-43; Chapter 6 "I've Worked It Out": Roosevelt's Plan to Win the Peace and Defy Death, 1944-45

Chapter 7 The Diplomacy of Trauma: Kennan and His Colleagues in Moscow, 1933-46Chapter 8 Guns and Kisses in the Kremlin: Ambassadors Harriman and Clark Kerr Encounter Stalin, 1943-46; Chapter 9 "Roosevelt's Death Has Changed Everything": Truman's First Days, April-June 1945; Chapter 10 The Lost Alliance: Widespread Anxiety and Deepening Ideology, July 1945-March 1946; Conclusion and Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Bibliographical Note; Notes; Index

In the spring of 1945, as the Allied victory in Europe was approaching, the shape of the postwar world hinged on the personal politics and flawed personalities of Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. Roosevelt's Lost Alliances captures this moment and shows how FDR crafted a winning coalition by overcoming the different habits, upbringings, sympathies, and past experiences of the three leaders. In particular, Roosevelt trained his famous charm on Stalin, lavishing respect on him, salving his insecurities, and rendering him more amenable to compromise on some matters. Yet, even as

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Costigliola (history, Univ. of Connecticut) describes the functional alliance among the big three-Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin-during World War II and how, after Roosevelt's death, it was undermined by smaller "alliances" among FDR's couriers. Churchill is presented as an unchanging warrior and colonialist, whereas Stalin is portrayed not as a conventional madman but a "realist" who, despite his brutality, sought secure borders, internal order, modernization, and respect for the Soviet Union. FDR is pictured as being in reasonable health at Yalta and not bamboozled by Stalin. The three forged a pragmatic relationship in which their nations would police the world via the Security Council of the United Nations. Yet the author argues that FDR was too demanding of his top assistants; once FDR was out of the picture, his assistants formed new alliances with and were able to manipulate Truman, whom FDR had never taken seriously as his vice president. VERDICT This book offers a provocative psychological thesis on leadership and diplomacy that contributes to understanding the origins of the Cold War. It will appeal to scholars and general readers interested in the transition of the Allies from World War II to the Cold War. Highly recommended.-William D. Pederson, Louisiana State Univ.-Shreveport (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In his analysis of the creation of the Allied partnership during WW II and its dissolution soon thereafter, Costigliola (Univ. of Connecticut) explores the lives and personalities of Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Josef Stalin, and Harry Truman (as well as these leaders' main advisers) and the culturally conditioned emotions that formed their perceptions. By emphasizing FDR's predominant role in forging and maintaining the alliance, as well as the demise of the coalition as a consequence of Roosevelt's death, the author presents a classic argument for the "great man" view of history. Simply put, the Cold War was not inevitable, but derived from Truman's unraveling of the human connections made by Roosevelt and his diplomatic team. This well-written work, based on extensive use of the private papers, personal correspondence, and published memoirs of the major participants, provides an interesting perspective on the wartime alliance and the origins of the Cold War, guaranteed to spark discussion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. K. J. Volanto Collin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Costigliola is professor of history at the University of Connecticut and former president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. He is the author of France and the United States and Awkward Dominion.

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