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All the News That's Fit to Sell : How the Market Transforms Information into News

By: Hamilton, James T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (355 p.).ISBN: 9781400841417.Subject(s): Press -- Economic aspects -- United States | Press -- United States | Television broadcasting of news -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: All the News That's Fit to Sell : How the Market Transforms Information into NewsDDC classification: 070 | 302.23 LOC classification: PN4888Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; All the News That's FIT TO SELL; Title; Copyright; For Matthew WHO ALWAYS BRINGS GOOD NEWS; Contents; Acknowledgments; All the News That's FIT TO SELL; Introduction; Chapter 1: Economic Theories of News; Chapter 2: A Market for Press Independence: The Evolution of Nonpartisan Newspapers in the Nineteenth Century; Chapter 3: News Audiences: How Strong Are the Public's Interests in the Public Interest?; Chapter 4: Information Programs on Network Television; Chapter 5: What Is News on Local Television Stations and in Local Newspapers
Chapter 6: The Changing Nature of the Network Evening News ProgramsChapter 7: News on the Net; Chapter 8: Journalists as Goods; Chapter 9: Content, Consequences, and Policy Choices; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism--media bias, soft news, and pundits as celebrities--arise from the impact of this economic logic on news judgments. This is the first book to develop an economic theory of news, analyze evidence across a wide
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Cover; All the News That's FIT TO SELL; Title; Copyright; For Matthew WHO ALWAYS BRINGS GOOD NEWS; Contents; Acknowledgments; All the News That's FIT TO SELL; Introduction; Chapter 1: Economic Theories of News; Chapter 2: A Market for Press Independence: The Evolution of Nonpartisan Newspapers in the Nineteenth Century; Chapter 3: News Audiences: How Strong Are the Public's Interests in the Public Interest?; Chapter 4: Information Programs on Network Television; Chapter 5: What Is News on Local Television Stations and in Local Newspapers

Chapter 6: The Changing Nature of the Network Evening News ProgramsChapter 7: News on the Net; Chapter 8: Journalists as Goods; Chapter 9: Content, Consequences, and Policy Choices; Notes; Bibliography; Index

That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism--media bias, soft news, and pundits as celebrities--arise from the impact of this economic logic on news judgments. This is the first book to develop an economic theory of news, analyze evidence across a wide

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In his previous book, Channeling Violence, Hamilton (public policy, Duke Univ.) showed that the market dictates the amount of violence appearing on television. His new book discusses how economics affects the presentation of news and how market pressures have reduced the amount of hard news appearing in the media generally. He begins by offering different economic theories of news; goes on to discuss the rise of nonpartisan newspapers, which began in 1870; and then includes an analysis of the news audience, asking how much interest they actually have in hard news. The remainder of the book reviews the various methods used by audiences to access news, including newspapers, television (including cable and evening news programs), and the Internet. As Hamilton shows, news is now presented to specific audiences, depending on marketing decisions, with a resultant shift from political news to softer topics such as entertainment. He recommends ways to counteract this situation and increase the amount of hard news available to the consumer. Hamilton includes a wealth of supporting information, including many tables and graphs, 40 pages of notes, and an extensive bibliography. Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.-Joel W. Tscherne, Cleveland P.L. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James T. Hamilton is Charles S. Sydnor Professor of Public Policy, Economics, and Political Science at Duke University. He has written or coauthored six books, including Regulation through Revelation and Channeling Violence (Princeton), which won the Shorenstein Center's Goldsmith Book Prize. He is also a recipient of the David N. Kershaw award for distinguished public policy research.

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