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The First Cold Warrior : Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism

By: Spalding, Elizabeth Edwards.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2006Description: 1 online resource (334 p.).ISBN: 9780813171289.Subject(s): Cold War | Cold War | Internationalism - History - 20th century | Internationalism -- History -- 20th century | Liberalism - United States - History - 20th century | Liberalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Truman, Harry S | Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972 | United States - Foreign relations - 1945-1953Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The First Cold Warrior : Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal InternationalismDDC classification: 973.918092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front cover; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Beginnings of Truman's Internationalsim; 2. Framing Containment; 3. The Truman Doctrine; 4. The Politics of the Marshall Plan; 5. Kennan's Sources of Soviet Conduct; 6. The Beginning of the Atlantic Alliance; 7. The Purpose and Structure of National Security; 8. The Culmination of Truman's Containment; 9. History, Faith, and Peace in Truman's Thought; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: From the moment he took the oath of office in April 1945, Harry Truman was required to make difficult decisions in an increasingly dangerous world. The results -- notably the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization -- were the building blocks of containment, a strategic approach usually associated with George F. Kennan. In this fresh account, based on primary sources, Elizabeth Edwards Spalding argues that it was Truman himself, shaped by history, experience, and religious faith, who outlined and directed America's practice of containment. In so doing,
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Front cover; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Beginnings of Truman's Internationalsim; 2. Framing Containment; 3. The Truman Doctrine; 4. The Politics of the Marshall Plan; 5. Kennan's Sources of Soviet Conduct; 6. The Beginning of the Atlantic Alliance; 7. The Purpose and Structure of National Security; 8. The Culmination of Truman's Containment; 9. History, Faith, and Peace in Truman's Thought; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

From the moment he took the oath of office in April 1945, Harry Truman was required to make difficult decisions in an increasingly dangerous world. The results -- notably the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization -- were the building blocks of containment, a strategic approach usually associated with George F. Kennan. In this fresh account, based on primary sources, Elizabeth Edwards Spalding argues that it was Truman himself, shaped by history, experience, and religious faith, who outlined and directed America's practice of containment. In so doing,

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Spalding (Claremont McKenna College) has written a volume that is sure to cause controversy. Based on copious primary and secondary research, her book concludes that President Truman was actually the architect of containment. A chapter on George Kennan indicates that his ideas about containment were much more limited than those of Truman, and in Spalding's estimation, his entire approach to dealing with the Soviet Union would have been much less effective. While the author shows disdain for Kennan, she exalts Truman's anticommunist stance. She praises the Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the acceptance of NSC68 and offers them as examples of positive Cold War actions. Truman, she argues, understood the need to show that the US would use military force, if necessary, to stop Soviet expansion. Spalding credits adviser Clark Clifford as helping to influence the president, but never waivers in her enthusiasm for Truman's own thinking. Truman supporters will praise the volume, but may take exception to some of the criticism of Kennan. All readers, however, will have to wrestle with Spalding's arguments, including the assertion that Truman formulated a "liberal internationalism" that neither Woodrow Wilson nor Franklin Roosevelt had exhibited. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. Yarnell Montana State University

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