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Women Writers and Journalists in the Nineteenth-Century South.

By: Wells, Jonathan Daniel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Cambridge Studies on the American South: Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (258 p.).ISBN: 9781139138093.Subject(s): American literature -- Women authors -- Southern States -- History and criticism | American literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Journalism -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Journalism and literature -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Literature -- Publishing -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Periodicals -- Publishing -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Women -- Press coverage -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Women in journalism -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Women''s periodicals, American -- Southern States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women Writers and Journalists in the Nineteenth-Century SouthDDC classification: 810.9 | 810.9/92870975 | 810.992870975 LOC classification: PN4888.W66 .W48 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART ONE FOUNDATIONS; 1 Reading, Literary Magazines, and the Debate overGender Equality; 2 Education, Gender, and Community in the ­Nineteenth-Century South; PART TWO WOMEN JOURNALISTS AND WRITERS IN THE OLD SOUTH; 3 Periodicals and Literary Culture; 4 Female Authors and Magazine Writing; 5 Antebellum Women Editors and Journalists; PART THREE WOMEN JOURNALISTS AND WRITERS IN THE NEW SOUTH; 6 New South Periodicals and a New Literary Culture; 7 Writing a New South for Women; 8 Postwar Women and Professional Journalism
Epilogue Women's Press Associations and Professional JournalismBibliography; Index
Summary: Examines women writers in the nineteenth-century South, offering new insights into women and gender roles.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN4888.W66 .W48 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=803219 Available EBL803219

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART ONE FOUNDATIONS; 1 Reading, Literary Magazines, and the Debate overGender Equality; 2 Education, Gender, and Community in the ­Nineteenth-Century South; PART TWO WOMEN JOURNALISTS AND WRITERS IN THE OLD SOUTH; 3 Periodicals and Literary Culture; 4 Female Authors and Magazine Writing; 5 Antebellum Women Editors and Journalists; PART THREE WOMEN JOURNALISTS AND WRITERS IN THE NEW SOUTH; 6 New South Periodicals and a New Literary Culture; 7 Writing a New South for Women; 8 Postwar Women and Professional Journalism

Epilogue Women's Press Associations and Professional JournalismBibliography; Index

Examines women writers in the nineteenth-century South, offering new insights into women and gender roles.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Wells (Temple Univ.) uses a combination of thematic and chronological approaches as he covers the "foundations" of the periodical movement as well as the issues women writers and editors explored in these periodicals in both the pre-Civil War South and the postwar era. His discussion provides an essential focus on the ways both black and white women in the southern US were intellectually challenged as editors, writers, and readers of periodicals during the 19th century. Though the importance of 19th-century periodicals to women writers and editors has been well established in books such as Noriko Suzuki's The Re-Invention of the American West: Women's Periodicals and Gendered Geography in the Late Nineteenth-Century United States (2009) and editors Sharon M. Harris and Ellen Gruber Garvey's Blue Pencils and Hidden Hands: Women Editing Periodicals, 1830-1910 (2004), Wells addresses a specific demographic, bringing fresh insight into the discussion of this literary culture. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. T. L. Stowell Adrian College

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