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Fatal Self-Deception : Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South

By: Genovese, Eugene D.
Contributor(s): Fox-Genovese, Elizabeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (252 p.).ISBN: 9781139159555.Subject(s): Paternalism -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Plantation owners -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Plantation workers -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Slaves -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Whites -- Southern States -- Social conditions -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fatal Self-Deception : Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old SouthDDC classification: 306.3/620975 | 306.3620975 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Fatal Self-Deception Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South; Advance Praise for Fatal Self-Deception; Title; Copyright; For Deborah Ann Symonds Gifted Scholar and Wonderful Friend and For her partner, Melissa Cano, and their children, Sarah and Sam; Contents; Preface; Abbreviations; Manuscript Collections; Introduction; 1 "Boisterous Passions"; Edmund Burke's Cautionary Tale; Morals; Apprehensive Parents; Young Gentlemen in Fields and Stores; Weighed in the Balances; 2 The Complete Household; Paternal Authority; Property in Man?; Household Problems; Slave Sales
3 Strangers within the GatesSundry White Servants; Governesses and Tutors; Hired Laborers; Overseers and Their Families; 4 Loyal and Loving Slaves; Masterful Forbearance; Mutual Dependency and Manipulation; Souls; Grief and Money; Tests of Faith; Dangerous Wishes; 5 The Blacks' Best and Most Faithful Friend; A Stagnant Race; Black Incapacity; Black Thoughts, According to White Critics; Views of Emancipation; News from Africa; The Fate of the Indians; The Specter of Barbarism; 6 Guardians of a Helpless Race; Vindication from the Free States; Abolitionism Indicted for Racism
Persistent Fears of Black ExterminationWhite Recognition of Black Achievement; An Incongruity; 7 Devotion unto Death; Armed Slaves: Friends or Foes?; Concern for White Women; Mounting Crises; Body Servants in War and Propaganda; The Confederacy Opts for Black Troops; Notes; Introduction; 1. "Boisterous Passions"; 2. The Complete Household; 3. Strangers within the Gates; 4. Loyal and Loving Slaves; 5. The Blacks' Best and Most Faithful Friend; 6. Guardians of a Helpless Race; 7. Devotion unto Death; Index
Summary: Discusses how slaveholders perpetuated and rationalized a romanticized version of life on the plantation.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E441 .G39 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=807218 Available EBL807218

Cover; Fatal Self-Deception Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South; Advance Praise for Fatal Self-Deception; Title; Copyright; For Deborah Ann Symonds Gifted Scholar and Wonderful Friend and For her partner, Melissa Cano, and their children, Sarah and Sam; Contents; Preface; Abbreviations; Manuscript Collections; Introduction; 1 "Boisterous Passions"; Edmund Burke's Cautionary Tale; Morals; Apprehensive Parents; Young Gentlemen in Fields and Stores; Weighed in the Balances; 2 The Complete Household; Paternal Authority; Property in Man?; Household Problems; Slave Sales

3 Strangers within the GatesSundry White Servants; Governesses and Tutors; Hired Laborers; Overseers and Their Families; 4 Loyal and Loving Slaves; Masterful Forbearance; Mutual Dependency and Manipulation; Souls; Grief and Money; Tests of Faith; Dangerous Wishes; 5 The Blacks' Best and Most Faithful Friend; A Stagnant Race; Black Incapacity; Black Thoughts, According to White Critics; Views of Emancipation; News from Africa; The Fate of the Indians; The Specter of Barbarism; 6 Guardians of a Helpless Race; Vindication from the Free States; Abolitionism Indicted for Racism

Persistent Fears of Black ExterminationWhite Recognition of Black Achievement; An Incongruity; 7 Devotion unto Death; Armed Slaves: Friends or Foes?; Concern for White Women; Mounting Crises; Body Servants in War and Propaganda; The Confederacy Opts for Black Troops; Notes; Introduction; 1. "Boisterous Passions"; 2. The Complete Household; 3. Strangers within the Gates; 4. Loyal and Loving Slaves; 5. The Blacks' Best and Most Faithful Friend; 6. Guardians of a Helpless Race; 7. Devotion unto Death; Index

Discusses how slaveholders perpetuated and rationalized a romanticized version of life on the plantation.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This slender volume (27 percent is documentation), the fresh and welcome fruit of four decades of collaboration between Genovese (emer., Univ. of Rochester) and the late Fox-Genovese, culminates their iconoclastic, razor-sharp analysis of antebellum southern slaveholding paternalism. In The Mind of the Master Class (CH, Oct'06, 44-1124), they explored the evolving religious and historical dimensions of this worldview, followed by Slavery in White and Black (CH, Oct'09, 47-1040), a work that probed its assertions and implications. In this final volume, the authors unveil the subliminal emotional drives laid bare when, in April 1865, the world the slave masters had built collapsed at Appomattox. Mindful of the southern paternalists' ideological posturing, contradictions, and self-serving rhetoric, Genovese and Fox-Genovese nevertheless take them seriously, connecting their Weltanschauung to the planters' self-realization. Slaveholders upheld the unity of humankind while rejecting notions of egalitarianism, equating paternalism with Christian benevolence and positioning the family at the center of a universe threatened by secular rationalism and majoritarian democracy. Planter myopia and narcissism, slave disloyalty before and during the Civil War, and black agency and accomplishment following emancipation proved the lie of the "our family, white and black" ideal. Summing Up: Recommended. For all collections. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte

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