Grassroots Garveyism : The Universal Negro Improvement Association in the Rural South, 1920-1927

By: Rolinson, Mary GMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (301 p.)ISBN: 9780807872789Subject(s): African American political activists -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Race identity --Southern States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Southern States -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Black nationalism -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 -- Influence | Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Southern States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Southern States -- Rural conditions | Universal Negro Improvement Association -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Grassroots Garveyism : The Universal Negro Improvement Association in the Rural South, 1920-1927DDC classification: 305.896073 LOC classification: E185.61 .R745 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
attachment; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Rediscovering Southern Garveyism; 1 Antecedents; 2 Lessons; 3 Growth; 4 Members; 5 Appeal; 6 Transition; Epilogue: Legacy; Appendix A. UNIA Divisions in the Eleven States of the Former Confederacy; Appendix B. Numbers of Southern Members of UNIA Divisions by State; Appendix C. Numbers of Sympathizers Involved in Mass Meetings and Petitions for Garvey's Release from Jail and Prison, 1923-1927; Appendix D. Phases of Organization of UNIA Divisions in the South by State; Appendix E. Ministers as Southern UNIA Officers, 1926-1928
Appendix F. Profiles of UNIA Members in Georgia, Arkansas, and Mississippi, 1922-1928, and NAACP Branch Leaders in Georgia, 1917-1920Appendix G. Women Organizers in the UNIA in the South, 1922-1928; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: The black separatist movement led by Marcus Garvey has long been viewed as a phenomenon of African American organization in the urban North. But as Mary Rolinson demonstrates, the largest number of Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) divisions and Garvey's most devoted and loyal followers were found in the southern Black Belt. Tracing the path of organizers from northern cities to Virginia, and then from the Upper to the Deep South, Rolinson remaps the movement to include this vital but overlooked region.Rolinson shows how Garvey's southern constituency sprang from cities, c
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attachment; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Rediscovering Southern Garveyism; 1 Antecedents; 2 Lessons; 3 Growth; 4 Members; 5 Appeal; 6 Transition; Epilogue: Legacy; Appendix A. UNIA Divisions in the Eleven States of the Former Confederacy; Appendix B. Numbers of Southern Members of UNIA Divisions by State; Appendix C. Numbers of Sympathizers Involved in Mass Meetings and Petitions for Garvey's Release from Jail and Prison, 1923-1927; Appendix D. Phases of Organization of UNIA Divisions in the South by State; Appendix E. Ministers as Southern UNIA Officers, 1926-1928

Appendix F. Profiles of UNIA Members in Georgia, Arkansas, and Mississippi, 1922-1928, and NAACP Branch Leaders in Georgia, 1917-1920Appendix G. Women Organizers in the UNIA in the South, 1922-1928; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

The black separatist movement led by Marcus Garvey has long been viewed as a phenomenon of African American organization in the urban North. But as Mary Rolinson demonstrates, the largest number of Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) divisions and Garvey's most devoted and loyal followers were found in the southern Black Belt. Tracing the path of organizers from northern cities to Virginia, and then from the Upper to the Deep South, Rolinson remaps the movement to include this vital but overlooked region.Rolinson shows how Garvey's southern constituency sprang from cities, c

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Basing her book on extensive primary sources and a solid reading of the historical literature, Rolinson seeks a new interpretation of Marcus Garvey's United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) among poor rural black southerners. The author sidesteps judgment of Garvey the man and concentrates on the masses that joined UNIA. In them, she finds an important link between the era and thought of Booker T. Washington and the rise of the NAACP and the mid-20th-century Civil Rights Movement. By keeping the focus on the grass roots, Rolinson succeeds in making that critical connection. She writes that the "archetypal" rural southern Garveyite was a cotton tenant or sharecropper who lived in a remote black majority community beset by a violent white supremacy. The author argues that Garveyism's tenets as understood by its rural southern practitioners ("self-defense and separation to protect their families from lynching and sexual exploitation") took hold "very quickly" in the South. Even after Garvey himself faded from the scene, the communities organized by UNIA provided useful models and seedbeds for the NAACP and the modern Civil Rights Movement by showing the importance of indigenous leadership and linkages with the African American church. Summing Up: Recommended. Scholars and graduate students. K. G. Wilkison Collin College

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