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Voter Turnout : A Social Theory of Political Participation

By: Rolfe, Meredith.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Political Economy of Institutions and Decisions: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (250 p.).ISBN: 9781139221313.Subject(s): Political participation -- Social aspects -- United States | Political participation -- Social aspects | Voting -- Social aspects -- United States | Voting -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Voter Turnout : A Social Theory of Political ParticipationDDC classification: 324.6 | 324.601 LOC classification: JF1001 .R55 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Voter Turnout; Series Editors; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Figures; Tables; Preface; 1: Voting Together; THE SOCIAL THEORY OF VOTER TURNOUT; CONDITIONAL CHOICE AND CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKING; THE ORTHODOX VIEW: VOTERS MAKING DECISIONS; The Rational Actor Takes a Survey; CONTEXTUAL EXPLANATIONS OF VOTER TURNOUT; Institutions; Institutional Costs; Electoral Institutions; Mobilization and Strategic Politicians; Mobilization and Canvassing; Social Context and the Sociological Tradition; OVERVIEW OF REMAINING CHAPTERS; 2: Conditional Choice
THE EVIDENCE FOR CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKINGMATHEMATICAL MODELS OF CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKING; Conditional Decision Rules; The Three Basic Rules; Dynamics of Conditional Decision Models; ENGINEERING A MODEL AND MID-LEVEL THEORY; 3: The Social Meaning of Voting; SOCIAL MEANING: PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS; DATA AND METHODS; VOTING IS THE ACT OF AMERICAN CITIZEN; VOTER AS AMERICANS: IS THERE A CONSENSUS?; Partisanship; Nonvoters; AMERICAN CITIZENS: FORMAL EQUALITY, INFORMAL AMBIGUITY; All Americans Are Equal; The American Community; Authority in America; Market Pricing; CONCLUTION THOUGHTS
4: Conditional CooperationEXPERIMENTAL DECISION SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO VOTING; Citizenship in Social Dilemmas; Equality, Communality, and Authority in Social Dilemmas; DISTRIBUTION OF DECISION RULES; Self-Reports of Conditional Decision Rules; Experimental Manipulations and Conditional Decision Rules; Costs and the Distribution of Decision Rules; 5: Conditional Voters: Dynamics and networks; CONDITIONAL COOPERATION: THE BASIC DYNAMIC; Model Robustness Checks; CONDITIONAL COOPERATION I LOCAL SOCIAL NETWORKS; Simulating Personal Networks; Simulating Personal Networks
Empirical Estimates of Personal Network Degree and DensitySimulating Turnout on Local Social Networks; CONCLUSION; 6: The Social Theory of Turnout; STRATEGIC POLITICIANS AND CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKERS: A THEORETICAL SYNTHESIS; CROSS-NATIONAL VARIATION: FIRST MOVERS AND COSTS; VARIATIONS ACROSS ELECTIONS: CAMPAIGN ACTIVITY AND POLITICAL DISCUSSION; Salience Equals Network Size; Low Salience Does Not Equal High Costs; INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN TURNOUT; Individual Tendencies to Use Decision Rules; Direct Mobilization; Indirect Mobilization; 7: Education and High-Salience Elections
SOCIAL THEORY: IMPLICATIONS OF THE MODELA NEW LOOK AT EDUCATION; Social Network Size; Education; Mobilization; Other Measures; COMPARING SOCIAL COOPERATION AND CIVIC VOLUNTARISM; Education and Political Interest; Education and Turnout; Multivariate Estimates; DISCUSSION; 8: Mobilization in Low-Salience Elections; TURNOUT PATTERN IN LOW-SALIENCE ELECTIONS; DATA; Socioeconomic Status; Turnout Rate; Mobilization; CANDIDATES, CAMPAIGNING, AND SOCIAL TIES; Institutions and Social Ties: Measuring Campaign Activity; Institutions and Social Ties: Measuring Campaign Activity
MOBILIZATION AND TURNOUT AT THE PRECINCT LEVEL
Summary: Combines positive political theory, social network research and computational modeling, explaining why some people are more likely to vote than others.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JF1001 .R55 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=833491 Available EBL833491

Cover; Voter Turnout; Series Editors; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Figures; Tables; Preface; 1: Voting Together; THE SOCIAL THEORY OF VOTER TURNOUT; CONDITIONAL CHOICE AND CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKING; THE ORTHODOX VIEW: VOTERS MAKING DECISIONS; The Rational Actor Takes a Survey; CONTEXTUAL EXPLANATIONS OF VOTER TURNOUT; Institutions; Institutional Costs; Electoral Institutions; Mobilization and Strategic Politicians; Mobilization and Canvassing; Social Context and the Sociological Tradition; OVERVIEW OF REMAINING CHAPTERS; 2: Conditional Choice

THE EVIDENCE FOR CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKINGMATHEMATICAL MODELS OF CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKING; Conditional Decision Rules; The Three Basic Rules; Dynamics of Conditional Decision Models; ENGINEERING A MODEL AND MID-LEVEL THEORY; 3: The Social Meaning of Voting; SOCIAL MEANING: PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS; DATA AND METHODS; VOTING IS THE ACT OF AMERICAN CITIZEN; VOTER AS AMERICANS: IS THERE A CONSENSUS?; Partisanship; Nonvoters; AMERICAN CITIZENS: FORMAL EQUALITY, INFORMAL AMBIGUITY; All Americans Are Equal; The American Community; Authority in America; Market Pricing; CONCLUTION THOUGHTS

4: Conditional CooperationEXPERIMENTAL DECISION SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO VOTING; Citizenship in Social Dilemmas; Equality, Communality, and Authority in Social Dilemmas; DISTRIBUTION OF DECISION RULES; Self-Reports of Conditional Decision Rules; Experimental Manipulations and Conditional Decision Rules; Costs and the Distribution of Decision Rules; 5: Conditional Voters: Dynamics and networks; CONDITIONAL COOPERATION: THE BASIC DYNAMIC; Model Robustness Checks; CONDITIONAL COOPERATION I LOCAL SOCIAL NETWORKS; Simulating Personal Networks; Simulating Personal Networks

Empirical Estimates of Personal Network Degree and DensitySimulating Turnout on Local Social Networks; CONCLUSION; 6: The Social Theory of Turnout; STRATEGIC POLITICIANS AND CONDITIONAL DECISION MAKERS: A THEORETICAL SYNTHESIS; CROSS-NATIONAL VARIATION: FIRST MOVERS AND COSTS; VARIATIONS ACROSS ELECTIONS: CAMPAIGN ACTIVITY AND POLITICAL DISCUSSION; Salience Equals Network Size; Low Salience Does Not Equal High Costs; INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN TURNOUT; Individual Tendencies to Use Decision Rules; Direct Mobilization; Indirect Mobilization; 7: Education and High-Salience Elections

SOCIAL THEORY: IMPLICATIONS OF THE MODELA NEW LOOK AT EDUCATION; Social Network Size; Education; Mobilization; Other Measures; COMPARING SOCIAL COOPERATION AND CIVIC VOLUNTARISM; Education and Political Interest; Education and Turnout; Multivariate Estimates; DISCUSSION; 8: Mobilization in Low-Salience Elections; TURNOUT PATTERN IN LOW-SALIENCE ELECTIONS; DATA; Socioeconomic Status; Turnout Rate; Mobilization; CANDIDATES, CAMPAIGNING, AND SOCIAL TIES; Institutions and Social Ties: Measuring Campaign Activity; Institutions and Social Ties: Measuring Campaign Activity

MOBILIZATION AND TURNOUT AT THE PRECINCT LEVEL

Combines positive political theory, social network research and computational modeling, explaining why some people are more likely to vote than others.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Voter turnout is normally discussed from the perspective that voters are isolated individuals making a decision based on a cost-benefit analysis. Although these models may explain why many do not vote, they are remarkably unsatisfying in explaining why so many do vote. In contrast, Rolfe (management department, London School of Economics and Political Science) borrows the rigor of formal theory and applies it to an understanding of voters as socially embedded decision makers. This work is well grounded in two rich traditions and addresses social choice from economic and social perspectives. Rolfe addresses the topic with a multi-modal approach and uses a variety of data sources. The assumption of this book is that the bulk of citizens decide to vote contingent on the decisions of those around them. If there is a small core who always vote, their decision spreads through the public, leading to turnouts similar to what is observed in elections. The suggestion is that the factors normally associated with voting--like education and church attendance--do not cause turnout. Rather, they act as proxies for the social embeddedness, which is the true causal factor. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. T. Marchant-Shapiro Southern Connecticut State University

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