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Marigold : The Lost Chance for Peace in Vietnam

By: Hershberg, James.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Cold War International History Project: Publisher: Palo Alto : Stanford University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (936 p.).ISBN: 9780804783880.Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- 1963-1969 | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Diplomatic history | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- PeaceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Marigold : The Lost Chance for Peace in VietnamDDC classification: 959.704/31 | 959.7043 | 959.70431 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Maps and Photographs; Introduction; A Note on Names and Terminology; Abbreviations Used in the Text; Prologue: Mission Impossible? "Operation Lumbago" and LBJ's Thirty-Seven-Day Bombing Pause, December 1965-January 1966; Chapter 1: Ðông Chí Lewandowski's Secret Mission: The Players Take Their Places, February- June 1966; Chapter 2: "Could It Really Be Peace?" Marigold's "Devious Channels"-Act One: July 1966; Chapter 3: Intermezzo: August to October 1966-A "Mosaic of Indiscretions and Rumors""; Chapter 4: "A Nerve-Eating Business": Marigold Blossoms-Act Two: November 1966
Chapter 5: "Something Big Has Happened": Toward the Warsaw Meeting, December 1-5, 1966Chapter 6: Informing the North Vietnamese Ambassador in Warsaw: Nguyen Dinh Phuong's Marigold Mystery Tour; Chapter 7: "It Is Pity": Waiting for Gronouski-December 6, 1966; Chapter 8: "It Looked as If We Could Move Forward": Marigold in Suspense, December 7-13, 1966; Chapter 9: "The Americans Have Gone Mad": Bombing Hanoi Again, December 13/14-18, 1966; Chapter 10: "The Christmas Present": Marigold's Last Gasp, and First Leaks, December 19-24, 1966
Chapter 11: "The Ultimate Reply": The End of the Affair, December 25-31, 1966Chapter 12: Secret Spats: Talking and Fighting, January 1967; Chapter 13: "A Sunburst of Recriminations": Riders on the Storm, February-June 1967; Chapter 14: The Long Year Wanes: D'Orlandi, Lodge, and Lewandowski Leave Vietnam, March-June 1967; Chapter 15: "You Will Never Get the Inside Story": The Secret Search for The Secret Search for Peace in Vietnam, May 1967-March 1968; Chapter 16: Sequels, Revivals, Regrets: Marigold's Echoes during LBJ's Last Year, February 1968-January 1969
Epilogue: "A Lot More Dead Young Soldiers"-Last Words, and the Battle for HistoryAcknowledgments; A Note on Sources; Notes; Selected Bibliography; About the Author; Index
Summary: Marigold presents the first rigorously documented, in-depth story of one of the Vietnam War's last great mysteries: the secret Polish-Italian peace initiative, codenamed ""Marigold,"" that sought to end the war, or at least to open direct talks between Washington and Hanoi, in 1966. The initiative failed, the war dragged on for another seven years, and this episode sank into history as an unresolved controversy. Antiwar critics claimed Johnson had bungled (or, worse, deliberately sabotaged) a breakthrough by bombing Hanoi on the eve of a planned historic secret US-North Vietnamese
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS559.7 H477 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=842219 Available EBL842219

Contents; Maps and Photographs; Introduction; A Note on Names and Terminology; Abbreviations Used in the Text; Prologue: Mission Impossible? "Operation Lumbago" and LBJ's Thirty-Seven-Day Bombing Pause, December 1965-January 1966; Chapter 1: Ðông Chí Lewandowski's Secret Mission: The Players Take Their Places, February- June 1966; Chapter 2: "Could It Really Be Peace?" Marigold's "Devious Channels"-Act One: July 1966; Chapter 3: Intermezzo: August to October 1966-A "Mosaic of Indiscretions and Rumors""; Chapter 4: "A Nerve-Eating Business": Marigold Blossoms-Act Two: November 1966

Chapter 5: "Something Big Has Happened": Toward the Warsaw Meeting, December 1-5, 1966Chapter 6: Informing the North Vietnamese Ambassador in Warsaw: Nguyen Dinh Phuong's Marigold Mystery Tour; Chapter 7: "It Is Pity": Waiting for Gronouski-December 6, 1966; Chapter 8: "It Looked as If We Could Move Forward": Marigold in Suspense, December 7-13, 1966; Chapter 9: "The Americans Have Gone Mad": Bombing Hanoi Again, December 13/14-18, 1966; Chapter 10: "The Christmas Present": Marigold's Last Gasp, and First Leaks, December 19-24, 1966

Chapter 11: "The Ultimate Reply": The End of the Affair, December 25-31, 1966Chapter 12: Secret Spats: Talking and Fighting, January 1967; Chapter 13: "A Sunburst of Recriminations": Riders on the Storm, February-June 1967; Chapter 14: The Long Year Wanes: D'Orlandi, Lodge, and Lewandowski Leave Vietnam, March-June 1967; Chapter 15: "You Will Never Get the Inside Story": The Secret Search for The Secret Search for Peace in Vietnam, May 1967-March 1968; Chapter 16: Sequels, Revivals, Regrets: Marigold's Echoes during LBJ's Last Year, February 1968-January 1969

Epilogue: "A Lot More Dead Young Soldiers"-Last Words, and the Battle for HistoryAcknowledgments; A Note on Sources; Notes; Selected Bibliography; About the Author; Index

Marigold presents the first rigorously documented, in-depth story of one of the Vietnam War's last great mysteries: the secret Polish-Italian peace initiative, codenamed ""Marigold,"" that sought to end the war, or at least to open direct talks between Washington and Hanoi, in 1966. The initiative failed, the war dragged on for another seven years, and this episode sank into history as an unresolved controversy. Antiwar critics claimed Johnson had bungled (or, worse, deliberately sabotaged) a breakthrough by bombing Hanoi on the eve of a planned historic secret US-North Vietnamese

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The failure of the secret talks code-named Marigold-which aimed during the second half of 1966 to jump-start serious peace negotiations between the United States and North Vietnam-was one of the great diplomatic collapses, not just of the Vietnam War but also of the entire Cold War era, claims Hershberg (history & international affairs, George Washington Univ.; James B. Conant: Harvard to Hiroshima and the Making of the Nuclear Age). This exhaustively researched investigation reveals that Marigold failed largely because the "Rolling Thunder" bombings of North Vietnam that December destroyed American negotiating credibility. Hershberg shows in fascinating detail the tireless efforts of Janusz Lewandowski, a Polish diplomat stationed in South Vietnam, and Giovanni D'Orlandi, Italy's ambassador to Saigon, to arrange the Marigold negotiations. They both gained the respect of American and Vietnamese diplomats but couldn't save the talks, which broke down 17 months before largely fruitless talks between the United States and North Vietnam began in Paris. VERDICT Hershberg has done remarkable work, piecing together the Marigold story from newly available Soviet documents, D'Orlandi's journals, and numerous interviews. He has calmed oceans of detail into a graceful narrative, an important work for Vietnam-era and Cold War historians.-Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Mixing deep archival research with positions "not recorded but easy to imagine," Hershberg (George Washington Univ.) superbly details a singular event of a highly controversial era--the Vietnam conflict. Blending biographical analysis and convoluted contextual studies, he presents a much-needed, multi-archival approach to two diplomats' efforts to "bring Washington and Hanoi to the table." The subtitle may have easily held a question mark, for the missed chance for peace presumes the two belligerents were ready to accept third-party efforts to end the Vietnam conflict. "[P]reponderant forces on both sides," Hershberg asserts, "still hoped to attain mutually incompatible aims through fighting," thereby bringing into question third-party efforts to broker peace negotiations. Placing the primary onus on the US and without the full benefit of Vietnamese archives, Hershberg concludes that the 1966 Rolling Thunder bombing campaigns amid diplomatic negotiations effected a continuation of a conflict that may have concluded years earlier. Yet even Hershberg concludes that the "evidence remains incomplete," necessitating further research. This nuanced, comprehensive study provides more fodder for the debate on a conflict that never seems to end. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students/faculty. G. Donato Bentley University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Hershberg is Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University. He was the founding director of the Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project and author of James B. Conant: Harvard to Hiroshima and the Making of the Nuclear Age (Stanford University Press, 1995).

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