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Radicalism at the Crossroads : African American Women Activists in the Cold War

By: Gore, Dayo F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2011Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (244 p.).ISBN: 9780814733028.Subject(s): African American radicals -- History -- 20th century | African American women political activists -- History -- 20th century | Communism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Radicalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Women radicals -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Radicalism at the Crossroads : African American Women Activists in the Cold WarDDC classification: 322.4/20820973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Forging a Community of Radical Intellectuals and Activists; 2 In Defense of Black Womanhood; 3 Reframing Civil Rights Activism during the Cold War; 4 Race and Gender at Work; 5 From Freedom to Freedomways; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: With the exception of a few iconic moments such as Rosa Parks's 1955 refusal to move to the back of a Montgomery bus, we hear little about what black women activists did prior to 1960. Perhaps this gap is due to the severe repression that radicals of any color in America faced as early as the 1930s, and into the Red Scare of the 1950s. To be radical, and black and a woman was to be forced to the margins and consequently, these women's stories have been deeply buried and all but forgotten by the general public and historians alike. In this exciting work of historical recovery, Dayo F. Gore unearths and examines a dynamic, extended community of black radical women during the early Cold War, including established Communist Party activists such as Claudia Jones, artists and writers such as Beulah Richardson, and lesser-known organizers such as Vicki Garvin and Thelma Dale. These women were part of a black left that laid much of the groundwork for both the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and later strains of black radicalism. Radicalism at the Crossroads offers a sustained and in-depth analysis of the political thought and activism of black women radicals during the Cold War period and adds a new dimension to our understanding of this tumultuous and violent time in United States history.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.615 .G668 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865480 Available EBL865480

CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Forging a Community of Radical Intellectuals and Activists; 2 In Defense of Black Womanhood; 3 Reframing Civil Rights Activism during the Cold War; 4 Race and Gender at Work; 5 From Freedom to Freedomways; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author

With the exception of a few iconic moments such as Rosa Parks's 1955 refusal to move to the back of a Montgomery bus, we hear little about what black women activists did prior to 1960. Perhaps this gap is due to the severe repression that radicals of any color in America faced as early as the 1930s, and into the Red Scare of the 1950s. To be radical, and black and a woman was to be forced to the margins and consequently, these women's stories have been deeply buried and all but forgotten by the general public and historians alike. In this exciting work of historical recovery, Dayo F. Gore unearths and examines a dynamic, extended community of black radical women during the early Cold War, including established Communist Party activists such as Claudia Jones, artists and writers such as Beulah Richardson, and lesser-known organizers such as Vicki Garvin and Thelma Dale. These women were part of a black left that laid much of the groundwork for both the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and later strains of black radicalism. Radicalism at the Crossroads offers a sustained and in-depth analysis of the political thought and activism of black women radicals during the Cold War period and adds a new dimension to our understanding of this tumultuous and violent time in United States history.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Gore (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst) provocatively argues that radical black female activists maintained communist affiliations and other "subversive" perspectives amid the anticommunist backlash of the 1950s. The author contends that traditional Cold War scholarship has portrayed the 1950s as a period of pervasive political repression that had the effect of silencing radical dissent. In contrast to the traditional declension narrative, Gore tells a more complex story of Cold War politics that highlights how a small cadre of relatively obscure radical black female activists remained committed to leftist political activism. In challenging traditional Cold War scholarship, Gore demonstrates that black female activists were influential leaders and "long-distance runners" whose radical politics stretched from the 1930s to the 1970s. Her analysis reveals that the black Left did not become dormant or exclusively frame demands for equality within the parameters of US liberalism. In doing so, Gore presents a more detailed and complex history of radical black female politics during the Cold War era. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduate and graduate history collections. K. K. Hill Texas Tech University

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