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Black in Latin America.

By: Louis, Gates Henry.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (272 p.).ISBN: 9780814733424.Subject(s): Blacks -- Latin America -- History | Blacks -- Race identity -- Latin America | Latin America -- Civilization -- African influences | Latin America -- Race relations | Slavery -- Latin America -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black in Latin AmericaDDC classification: 980/.00496 LOC classification: F1419.N4 G38 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Brazil: "May Exú Give Me the Power of Speech"; 2 Mexico: "The Black Grandma in the Closet"; 3 Peru: "The Blood of the Incas, the Blood of the Mandingas"; 4 The Dominican Republic: "Black behind the Ears"; 5 Haiti: "From My Ashes I Rise; God Is My Cause and My Sword"; 6 Cuba: The Next Cuban Revolution; Appendix: Color Categories in Latin America; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: 12.5 million Africans were shipped to the New World during the Middle Passage. While just over 11.0 million survived the arduous journey, only about 450,000 of them arrived in the United States. The rest-over ten and a half million-were taken to the Caribbean and Latin America. This astonishing fact changes our entire picture of the history of slavery in the Western hemisphere, and of its lasting cultural impact. These millions of Africans created new and vibrant cultures, magnificently compelling syntheses of various African, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish influences. Despite their
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F1419.N4 G38 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865504 Available EBL865504

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Brazil: "May Exú Give Me the Power of Speech"; 2 Mexico: "The Black Grandma in the Closet"; 3 Peru: "The Blood of the Incas, the Blood of the Mandingas"; 4 The Dominican Republic: "Black behind the Ears"; 5 Haiti: "From My Ashes I Rise; God Is My Cause and My Sword"; 6 Cuba: The Next Cuban Revolution; Appendix: Color Categories in Latin America; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author

12.5 million Africans were shipped to the New World during the Middle Passage. While just over 11.0 million survived the arduous journey, only about 450,000 of them arrived in the United States. The rest-over ten and a half million-were taken to the Caribbean and Latin America. This astonishing fact changes our entire picture of the history of slavery in the Western hemisphere, and of its lasting cultural impact. These millions of Africans created new and vibrant cultures, magnificently compelling syntheses of various African, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish influences. Despite their

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

With this companion to the recently aired PBS documentary of the same name, Gates (Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard Univ.; Faces of America) completes a three-continent trilogy on Afro-descended traditions that began with Wonders of the African World and followed with America Behind the Color Line. Here he pursues the question of what it has meant to be black in the Americas. The question, he says, is best answered outside North America, for about 10.8 million of the 11.2 million Africans who landed between 1502 and 1866 in the Americas went to the Caribbean and South America. Focusing on six countries-Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and Peru-Gates traces a multidirectional color line. The diversity of what he found shows throughout and especially in an 11-page appendix on color categories in Latin America. Verdict Gates's mix of interviews, insights, and personal commentary hardly challenges George Reid Andrews's Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 or the essays in Race and Nation in Modern Latin America by Nancy P. Appelbaum and others, but it offers general readers a snapshot perspective on the history and life of New World blacks amid legacies of slavery, plantation economics, and poverty.-Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Many people in the US do not realize that about 95 percent of the more than 11 million slaves shipped out of Africa during the Middle Passage arrived in Latin America and the Caribbean. Gates's realization of this fact led him to explore the history and culture of the African diaspora in the multicultural worlds of Latin America and the Caribbean. This is the third volume of a trilogy, following Wonders of the African World (1999), which focused on the African continent, and America behind the Color Line (2004), which examined the African American experience. As with these two earlier projects, this travelogue accompanies a similarly titled, four-hour PBS video. Gates (Harvard) focuses on African culture, politics, and religion in the six countries of Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and Peru. Readers desiring a deeper, more academic, and more comprehensive treatment of the African diaspora will be better served by George Reid Andrews, Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 (CH, Mar'05, 42-4193). Gates's highly readable and quickly paced book, however, serves a critically important role in bringing popular attention to the significant contributions of African descendants in Latin America and the Caribbean. Summing Up: Recommended. General collections/public libraries. M. Becker Truman State University

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