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Of Little Comfort : War Widows, Fallen Soldiers, and the Remaking of the Nation after the Great War

By: Kuhlman, Erika.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (236 p.).ISBN: 9780814749050.Subject(s): Germany -- Social conditions -- 1918-1933 | Nationalism -- History -- 20th century | Transnationalism -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Social conditions -- 1918-1932 | War widows -- Government policy -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | War widows -- Government policy -- United States -- History -- 20th century | War widows -- Government policy -- Western countries -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects -- Germany | World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects -- United States | World War, 1914-1918 -- WomenGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Of Little Comfort : War Widows, Fallen Soldiers, and the Remaking of the Nation after the Great WarDDC classification: 940.3/1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 An Army of Widows; 2 Trostlose Stunden: German War Widows; 3 The War Widows' Romance: Victory and Loss in the United States; 4 The Transnationalization of Soldiers, Widows, and War Relief; 5 "The Other Trench": Remarriage, Pro-natalism, and the Rebirthing of the Nation; Epilogue; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; About the Author
Summary: During and especially after World War I, the millions of black-clad widows on the streets of Europe's cities were a constant reminder that war caused carnage on a vast scale. But widows were far more than just a reminder of the war's fallen soldiers; they were literal and figurative actresses in how nations crafted their identities in the interwar era. In this extremely original study, Erika Kuhlman compares the ways in which German and American widows experienced their post-war status, and how that played into the cultures of mourning in their two nations: one defeated, the other victorious.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D639.W7 K84 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865632 Available EBL865632

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 An Army of Widows; 2 Trostlose Stunden: German War Widows; 3 The War Widows' Romance: Victory and Loss in the United States; 4 The Transnationalization of Soldiers, Widows, and War Relief; 5 "The Other Trench": Remarriage, Pro-natalism, and the Rebirthing of the Nation; Epilogue; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; About the Author

During and especially after World War I, the millions of black-clad widows on the streets of Europe's cities were a constant reminder that war caused carnage on a vast scale. But widows were far more than just a reminder of the war's fallen soldiers; they were literal and figurative actresses in how nations crafted their identities in the interwar era. In this extremely original study, Erika Kuhlman compares the ways in which German and American widows experienced their post-war status, and how that played into the cultures of mourning in their two nations: one defeated, the other victorious.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kuhlman (Idaho State Univ.) demonstrates just how important the histories of women and gender remain in her examination of the experience of post-WW I widows in the US and Germany. She has mined a variety of sources, including letters from individuals as well as those exchanged by institutions, and records from women's organizations such as the Gold Star Mothers. Kuhlman compels readers to view women whose husbands were lost to them after the war as more than just victims. They were also agents of change who not only demanded the support of the governments who had taken their husbands from them, but who also became aggressive advocates for peace. By examining the complications war widows faced, from how to support their families to dealing with their prescriptive images to remarriage, Kuhlman paints a new image of the interwar period. Her work adds new depth to understanding how, after the Great War, the often unheard and unnoticed inhabitants of nations carved a new place for themselves by challenging prevailing notions of their place within them. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. M. Morris College of Mount St. Joseph

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