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In The Company Of Black Men : The African Influence on African American Culture in New York City

By: Wilder, Craig Steven.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (356 p.).ISBN: 9780814784624.Subject(s): Africa, West -- Civilization | Africa, West -- Religious life and customs | African American men -- New York (State) -- New York -- Religion | African American men -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social life and customs | African American men -- New York (State) -- New York -- Societies, etc | African Americans -- New York (State) -- New York -- Relations with Africans | Black nationalism -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | New York (N.Y.) -- Civilization | United States -- Civilization -- African influences | Voluntarism -- New York (State) -- New York -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In The Company Of Black Men : The African Influence on African American Culture in New York CityDDC classification: 305.38/8960730747 LOC classification: F128.9.N4 W55 2001Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; ""Some Little Tribute": An Introduction; I African Voluntary Associations and the Rise of Black Spiritual Culture; 1 A Taunt from the Oppressed: The West African Institutional Legacy in New York City, 1644-1783; 2 Raising Mother Zion: The Fusion of African and British Institutions in New York, 1784-1822; 3 The Liberating Power of the Cross: The NYAS and the African Encounter with the Protestant Ethic,1774-1796; 4 "The Aristocracy of Character": African Societies and the Moral Consequence of Nationalism, 1784-1845
II African Voluntary Associations and the Making of the Public Sphere5 "The Inmates of My Sanctum Sanctorum": African Voluntary Associations and the Public Sphere,1808-1845; 6 In the Company of Black Men: Manhood and Obligation in the African Confraternity,1808-1857; 7 "A Single Voice": African Societies, the Press, and the Public Sphere, 1827-1861; 8 When Black Men Spoke of Freedom: Voluntary Associations and Nationalist Culture, 1809-1865; III The Transformation of African American Voluntarism; 9 "The Gaudy Carnival": The African Declension in the NYASMR, 1863-1945
10 "Shall It Be a Woman?": The Transformation of Black Men's Voluntarism, 1865-1960Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: From the subaltern assemblies of the enslaved in colonial New York City to the benevolent New York African Society of the early national era to the formation of the African Blood Brotherhood in twentieth century Harlem, voluntary associations have been a fixture of African-American communities. In the Company of Black Men examines New York City over three centuries to show that enslaved Africans provided the institutional foundation upon which African-American religious, political, and social culture could flourish. Arguing that the universality of the voluntary tradition in African-American c
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F128.9.N4 W55 2001 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865950 Available EBL865950

Contents; Acknowledgments; ""Some Little Tribute": An Introduction; I African Voluntary Associations and the Rise of Black Spiritual Culture; 1 A Taunt from the Oppressed: The West African Institutional Legacy in New York City, 1644-1783; 2 Raising Mother Zion: The Fusion of African and British Institutions in New York, 1784-1822; 3 The Liberating Power of the Cross: The NYAS and the African Encounter with the Protestant Ethic,1774-1796; 4 "The Aristocracy of Character": African Societies and the Moral Consequence of Nationalism, 1784-1845

II African Voluntary Associations and the Making of the Public Sphere5 "The Inmates of My Sanctum Sanctorum": African Voluntary Associations and the Public Sphere,1808-1845; 6 In the Company of Black Men: Manhood and Obligation in the African Confraternity,1808-1857; 7 "A Single Voice": African Societies, the Press, and the Public Sphere, 1827-1861; 8 When Black Men Spoke of Freedom: Voluntary Associations and Nationalist Culture, 1809-1865; III The Transformation of African American Voluntarism; 9 "The Gaudy Carnival": The African Declension in the NYASMR, 1863-1945

10 "Shall It Be a Woman?": The Transformation of Black Men's Voluntarism, 1865-1960Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author

From the subaltern assemblies of the enslaved in colonial New York City to the benevolent New York African Society of the early national era to the formation of the African Blood Brotherhood in twentieth century Harlem, voluntary associations have been a fixture of African-American communities. In the Company of Black Men examines New York City over three centuries to show that enslaved Africans provided the institutional foundation upon which African-American religious, political, and social culture could flourish. Arguing that the universality of the voluntary tradition in African-American c

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

This pioneering study of African American voluntary associations in New York City is an important book on a neglected topic. It is especially strong on the pre-Civil War period, the subject of eight of its ten chapters. Wilder (history, Williams College), who began his research when he discovered the papers of the New York African Society for Mutual Relief, shows an impressive knowledge of archival and rare print sources. In a revision of the historiographical orthodoxy, he argues that before the Civil War, organizations of black men were not derivative of their white counterparts but instead drew on a West African heritage of collective action. According to Wilder, national fraternal societies largely replaced the old local benevolent organizations after the Civil War. "The black associations that most easily incorporated individualistic values fared best." Wilder disagrees with historians who emphasize the West African character of African American fraternal societies and those who depict black fraternal societies as, at least in part, expressions of a collectivist tradition. Graduate students and faculty. D. M. Fahey Miami University

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