The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation : African Americans and the Fight for Freedom

By: Brasher, Glenn DavidMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (297 p.)ISBN: 9780807882528Subject(s): Peninsular Campaign, 1862 | Peninsular Campaign, 1862 | Slaves - Emancipation - United States | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Participation, African American | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, African AmericanGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation : African Americans and the Fight for FreedomDDC classification: 973.7/415 | 973.7415 LOC classification: E473.6 .B73 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction: An Evening on Malvern Hill; 1 Preludes: War, Slavery, and the Virginia Peninsula; 2 Contraband of War: April-July 1861; 3 War Is a Swift Educator: July-December 1861; 4 The Best Informed Residents in Virginia: December 1861-April 1862; 5 The Monuments to Negro Labor: April-May 1862; 6 Those by Whom These Relations Are Broken: May 1862; 7 An Invaluable Ally: Late May-July 1862; 8 A Higher Destiny: July 1862; Conclusion: Monarchs of All They Survey; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war--the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher's unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential m
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Cover; Contents; Introduction: An Evening on Malvern Hill; 1 Preludes: War, Slavery, and the Virginia Peninsula; 2 Contraband of War: April-July 1861; 3 War Is a Swift Educator: July-December 1861; 4 The Best Informed Residents in Virginia: December 1861-April 1862; 5 The Monuments to Negro Labor: April-May 1862; 6 Those by Whom These Relations Are Broken: May 1862; 7 An Invaluable Ally: Late May-July 1862; 8 A Higher Destiny: July 1862; Conclusion: Monarchs of All They Survey; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war--the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher's unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential m

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While the importance of the Emancipation Proclamation can never be overstated, the procedure by which slavery came to an end in a practical sense before President Lincoln or Congress took action is nearly as important. Brasher (Univ. of Alabama) reveals how attitudes about slavery changed for soldiers viewing the institution up close for the first time. Months before Lincoln announced the Proclamation, the Union Army, invading Virginia on the Peninsular Campaign, encountered large numbers of escaped slaves seeking refuge from their erstwhile owners. Confronted with the escaped slave problem on a massive scale, the Union Army formulated realistic policies to deal with slaves still subject to the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act. The Northern Army began the Peninsular Campaign with the goal of saving the Union, but soldiers found their attitudes changing, due to viewing the abuses of slavery, the help provided by escaped slaves, and the realization that ending slavery would hinder their Confederate enemy. By the end of the campaign, the Union Army became a safe haven for escaped slaves, and the Lincoln administration had a growing impetus for emancipation. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. S. J. Ramold Eastern Michigan University

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