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The River Flows On : Black Resistance, Culture, and Identity Formation in Early America

By: Rucker, Walter C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (303 p.).ISBN: 9780807148877.Subject(s): African Americans -- History -- To 1863 | African Americans -- Race identity | African Americans -- Rites and ceremonies | African Americans -- Social life and customs | Folklore -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Government, Resistance to -- United States -- History | Slave insurrections -- United States | Slaves -- United States -- Social conditions | United States -- History -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 | United States -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The River Flows On : Black Resistance, Culture, and Identity Formation in Early AmericaDDC classification: 306.3/62/0973 | 306.3620973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
COVER; CONTENTS; LIST OF TABLES; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; PART ONE: African Resistance in Colonial America; 1 Fires of Discontent, Echoes of Africa: The 1712 New York City Revolt; 2 "Only Draw in Your Countrymen": The 1741 New York City Conspiracy Revisited; 3 Dance, Conjure, and Flight: Culture and Resistance in Colonial South Carolina; PART TWO: African American Resistance in Antebellum America; 4 "We Will Wade to Our Knees in Blood": Blacksmiths and Ritual Spaces in Gabriel Prosser's Conspiracy; 5 "I Will Gather All Nations": Ethnic Collaboration in Denmark Vesey's Charleston Plot
6 "I Was Ordained for Some Great Purpose": Conjure, Christianity, and Nat Turner's RevoltCoda: Folklore and the Creation of an African American Identity; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: The River Flows On offers an impressively broad examination of slave resistance in America, spanning the colonial and antebellum eras in both the North and South and covering all forms of recalcitrance, from major revolts and rebellions to everyday acts of disobedience. Walter C. Rucker analyzes American slave resistance with a keen understanding of its African influences, tracing the emergence of an African American identity and culture. Rucker points to the shared cultural heritage that facilitated collective action among both African- and American-born slaves, such as the ubiquitous belief
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E447 .R83 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=876371 Available EBL876371

COVER; CONTENTS; LIST OF TABLES; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; PART ONE: African Resistance in Colonial America; 1 Fires of Discontent, Echoes of Africa: The 1712 New York City Revolt; 2 "Only Draw in Your Countrymen": The 1741 New York City Conspiracy Revisited; 3 Dance, Conjure, and Flight: Culture and Resistance in Colonial South Carolina; PART TWO: African American Resistance in Antebellum America; 4 "We Will Wade to Our Knees in Blood": Blacksmiths and Ritual Spaces in Gabriel Prosser's Conspiracy; 5 "I Will Gather All Nations": Ethnic Collaboration in Denmark Vesey's Charleston Plot

6 "I Was Ordained for Some Great Purpose": Conjure, Christianity, and Nat Turner's RevoltCoda: Folklore and the Creation of an African American Identity; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

The River Flows On offers an impressively broad examination of slave resistance in America, spanning the colonial and antebellum eras in both the North and South and covering all forms of recalcitrance, from major revolts and rebellions to everyday acts of disobedience. Walter C. Rucker analyzes American slave resistance with a keen understanding of its African influences, tracing the emergence of an African American identity and culture. Rucker points to the shared cultural heritage that facilitated collective action among both African- and American-born slaves, such as the ubiquitous belief

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Walter C. Rucker is a professor in the Department of African American and African Studies at Ohio State University.</p>

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