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Africans in Colonial Louisiana : The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth-Century

By: Hall, Gwendolyn Midlo.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 1995Description: 1 online resource (457 p.).ISBN: 9780807141076.Subject(s): 18th century | African Americans -- Louisiana -- History -- 18th century | Afro-Americans | Creoles | Creoles -- Louisiana -- History -- 18th century | History | Louisiana | Louisiana -- History -- To 1803 | Slavery | Slavery -- Louisiana -- History -- 18th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Africans in Colonial Louisiana : The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth-CenturyDDC classification: 976.3/00496073 | 976.300496073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Abbreviations and Short Titles; CHAPTER 1 Settlers, Soldiers, Indians, and Officials: The Chaos of French Rule; CHAPTER 2 Senegambia During the French Slave Trade to Louisiana; CHAPTER 3 Death and Revolt: The French Slave Trade to Louisiana; CHAPTER 4 The Bambara in Louisiana: From the Natchez Uprising to the Samba Bambara Conspiracy; CHAPTER 5 French New Orleans: Technology, Skills, Labor, Escape, Treatment; CHAPTER 6 The Creole Slaves: Origin, Family, Language, Folklore; CHAPTER 7 Bas du Fleuve: The Creole Slaves Adapt to the Cypress Swamp
CHAPTER 8 The Pointe Coupee Post: Race Mixture and Freedom at a Frontier SettlementCHAPTER 9 Re-Africanization Under Spanish Rule; CHAPTER 10 Unrest During the Early 1790s; CHAPTER 11 The 1795 Conspiracy in Pointe Coupee; Conclusion; Appendix A: Basic Facts About All Slave-Trade Voyages from Africa to Louisiana During the French Regime; Appendix B: African Nations of Slaves Accused of Crimes in Records of the Superior Council of Louisiana; Appendix C: Slaves Found in Pointe Coupee Inventories Between 1771 and 1802: Breakdown by Origin, Nation, Sex, and Percentage in Population
Appendix D: Evidence of Widespread Survival of African Names in Colonial LouisianaNote on Sources; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z
Summary: Although a number of important studies of American slavery have explored the formation of slave cultures in the English colonies, no book until now has undertaken a comprehensive assessment of the development of the distinctive Afro-Creole culture of colonial Louisiana. This culture, based upon a separate language community with its own folkloric, musical, religious, and historical traditions, was created by slaves brought directly from Africa to Louisiana before 1731. It still survives as the acknowledged cultural heritage of tens of thousands of people of all races in the southern part of th
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.93.L6 H16 1992 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=876386 Available EBL876386

Cover; Contents; Preface; Abbreviations and Short Titles; CHAPTER 1 Settlers, Soldiers, Indians, and Officials: The Chaos of French Rule; CHAPTER 2 Senegambia During the French Slave Trade to Louisiana; CHAPTER 3 Death and Revolt: The French Slave Trade to Louisiana; CHAPTER 4 The Bambara in Louisiana: From the Natchez Uprising to the Samba Bambara Conspiracy; CHAPTER 5 French New Orleans: Technology, Skills, Labor, Escape, Treatment; CHAPTER 6 The Creole Slaves: Origin, Family, Language, Folklore; CHAPTER 7 Bas du Fleuve: The Creole Slaves Adapt to the Cypress Swamp

CHAPTER 8 The Pointe Coupee Post: Race Mixture and Freedom at a Frontier SettlementCHAPTER 9 Re-Africanization Under Spanish Rule; CHAPTER 10 Unrest During the Early 1790s; CHAPTER 11 The 1795 Conspiracy in Pointe Coupee; Conclusion; Appendix A: Basic Facts About All Slave-Trade Voyages from Africa to Louisiana During the French Regime; Appendix B: African Nations of Slaves Accused of Crimes in Records of the Superior Council of Louisiana; Appendix C: Slaves Found in Pointe Coupee Inventories Between 1771 and 1802: Breakdown by Origin, Nation, Sex, and Percentage in Population

Appendix D: Evidence of Widespread Survival of African Names in Colonial LouisianaNote on Sources; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z

Although a number of important studies of American slavery have explored the formation of slave cultures in the English colonies, no book until now has undertaken a comprehensive assessment of the development of the distinctive Afro-Creole culture of colonial Louisiana. This culture, based upon a separate language community with its own folkloric, musical, religious, and historical traditions, was created by slaves brought directly from Africa to Louisiana before 1731. It still survives as the acknowledged cultural heritage of tens of thousands of people of all races in the southern part of th

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, Consulting Research Professor at the University of New Orleans and professor of history at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, is also the author of Social Control in Slave Plantation Societies: A Comparison of St. Domingue and Cuba.</p>

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