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Chicago's New Negroes : Modernity, the Great Migration, and Black Urban Life

By: Baldwin, Davarian L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (380 p.).ISBN: 9780807887608.Subject(s): African Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Social conditions -- 20th century | African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | Chicago (Ill.) -- History -- 1875- | Chicago (Ill.) -- Population -- History -- 20th century | Chicago (Ill.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Chicago (Ill.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Chicago's New Negroes : Modernity, the Great Migration, and Black Urban LifeDDC classification: 305.896/0730773109045 | 305.89607307 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: ''Chicago Has No Intelligentsia''?: Consumer Culture and Intellectual Life Reconsidered; One: Mapping the Black Metropolis: A Cultural Geography of the Stroll; Two: Making Do: Beauty, Enterprise, and the ''Makeover'' of Race Womanhood; Three: Theaters of War: Spectacles, Amusements, and the Emergence of Urban Film Culture; Four: The Birth of Two Nations: White Fears, Black Jeers, and the Rise of a ''Race Film'' Consciousness; Five: Sacred Tastes: The Migrant Aesthetics and Authority of Gospel Music
Six: The Sporting Life: Recreation, Self-Reliance, and Competing Visions of Race ManhoodEpilogue: The Crisis of the Black Bourgeoisie, Or, What If Harold Cruse Had Lived in Chicago?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F548.9.N4 B35 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=880033 Available EBL880033

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: ''Chicago Has No Intelligentsia''?: Consumer Culture and Intellectual Life Reconsidered; One: Mapping the Black Metropolis: A Cultural Geography of the Stroll; Two: Making Do: Beauty, Enterprise, and the ''Makeover'' of Race Womanhood; Three: Theaters of War: Spectacles, Amusements, and the Emergence of Urban Film Culture; Four: The Birth of Two Nations: White Fears, Black Jeers, and the Rise of a ''Race Film'' Consciousness; Five: Sacred Tastes: The Migrant Aesthetics and Authority of Gospel Music

Six: The Sporting Life: Recreation, Self-Reliance, and Competing Visions of Race ManhoodEpilogue: The Crisis of the Black Bourgeoisie, Or, What If Harold Cruse Had Lived in Chicago?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Baldwin (Boston College) calls his work an intellectual history of the New Negro Movement in Chicago during the first third of the 20th century. However, this monograph is much more than an intellectual history. Baldwin skillfully combines original sources such as newspapers and magazines of the period with secondary material to create a work that examines issues of class, economics, socialization, politics, and gender as they relate to the movement. The author traces the story of the migration of southern blacks to Chicago at the dawn of the 20th century, presenting a case study within the context of the mass migration of these people from south to north in search of a better life during this period that changed the face of both regions. Baldwin describes the resulting societal tensions the migration caused in Chicago, not only between blacks and whites, but within the black community as well, as the newcomers sought to define themselves in new ways from that of the existing black community in the city. This book, aimed mainly at an academic audience, is a fine addition to not only urban history, but also racial and economic historiography. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. A. Aiello Gordon College

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