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The Columbia History of the Vietnam War.

By: Anderson, David L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (483 p.).ISBN: 9780231509329.Subject(s): Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Influence | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Political aspects -- United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Social aspects | Vietnam War, 1961-1975Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Columbia History of the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/3 | 959.7043 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Abbreviations; Introduction: The Vietnam War and Its Enduring Historical Relevance; Part I: Chronological Perspectives; 1. Setting the Stage: Vietnamese Revolutionary Nationalism and the First Vietnam War; 2. "Dealing with a Government of Madmen": Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Ngo Dinh Diem; 3. South Vietnam Under Siege, 1961-1965: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Question of Escalation or Disengagement; 4. Lyndon Johnson and the Bombing of Vietnam: Politics and Military Choices; 5. Turning Point: The Vietnam War's Pivotal Year, November 1967-November 1968
6. Richard M. Nixon and the Vietnam War: The Paradox of Disengagemen twith EscalationPart II: Topical Perspectives; 7. American Strategy in the Vietnam War; 8. The Village War in Vietnam, 1965-1973; 9. Fighting for Family: Vietnamese Women and the American War; 10. Vietnamese Society at War; 11. "Hey, Hey, LBJ!"": American Domestic Politics andthe Vietnam War; 12. Cambodia and Laos in the Vietnam War; Part III: Postwar Perspectives; 13. The Legacy of the Vietnam War; 14. The Vietnam Syndrome; Contributors; Index
Summary: America's experience in Vietnam continues to figure prominently in debates over strategy and defense and within the discourse on the identity of the United States as a nation. Through fifteen essays rooted in recent scholarship, The Columbia History of the Vietnam War is a chronological and critical collective history central to any discussion of America's interests abroad.David Anderson opens with an essay on the Vietnam War's major themes and enduring relevance. Mark Philip Bradley (University of Chicago) reexamines the rise of Vietnamese revolutionary nationalism and the Viet
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Contents; Preface; Abbreviations; Introduction: The Vietnam War and Its Enduring Historical Relevance; Part I: Chronological Perspectives; 1. Setting the Stage: Vietnamese Revolutionary Nationalism and the First Vietnam War; 2. "Dealing with a Government of Madmen": Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Ngo Dinh Diem; 3. South Vietnam Under Siege, 1961-1965: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Question of Escalation or Disengagement; 4. Lyndon Johnson and the Bombing of Vietnam: Politics and Military Choices; 5. Turning Point: The Vietnam War's Pivotal Year, November 1967-November 1968

6. Richard M. Nixon and the Vietnam War: The Paradox of Disengagemen twith EscalationPart II: Topical Perspectives; 7. American Strategy in the Vietnam War; 8. The Village War in Vietnam, 1965-1973; 9. Fighting for Family: Vietnamese Women and the American War; 10. Vietnamese Society at War; 11. "Hey, Hey, LBJ!"": American Domestic Politics andthe Vietnam War; 12. Cambodia and Laos in the Vietnam War; Part III: Postwar Perspectives; 13. The Legacy of the Vietnam War; 14. The Vietnam Syndrome; Contributors; Index

America's experience in Vietnam continues to figure prominently in debates over strategy and defense and within the discourse on the identity of the United States as a nation. Through fifteen essays rooted in recent scholarship, The Columbia History of the Vietnam War is a chronological and critical collective history central to any discussion of America's interests abroad.David Anderson opens with an essay on the Vietnam War's major themes and enduring relevance. Mark Philip Bradley (University of Chicago) reexamines the rise of Vietnamese revolutionary nationalism and the Viet

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The Vietnam War still holds the public's attention nearly 46 years after the fall of Saigon. Many readers are attracted to combat narratives or analysis of the policy positions of the architects of the conflict. Only recently have scholars focused on the war's impact on the Vietnamese people and on issues rarely covered in traditional historical studies. Now, Columbia University Press and Anderson, a leading diplomatic historian (California State Univ., Monterey Bay), have published this brilliantly edited anthology featuring a wide variety of essays by the finest experts in the field. Richard Immerman, for instance, highlights the nuanced approach readers must take when reviewing how the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations dealt with Ngo Dinh Diem, and questions whether Kennedy would have withdrawn US forces as many have claimed. Many other scholars contribute to the excellence of this volume, particularly Jeffrey Kimball on Nixon's strategy of withdrawal via escalation; Lloyd Gardner's interpretation of LBJ's decision to seek a negotiated exit from Vietnam; and Eric Bergerud's analysis of the inner conflict fought within Vietnamese villages, which ultimately weakened US resolve. A must-have addition to any academic library seeking to update its collection. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. C. C. Lovett Emporia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David L. Anderson is professor of history emeritus at California State University, Monterey Bay, and past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. His books include Trapped by Success: The Eisenhower Administration and Vietnam and The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War .

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