Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Digital Media and Political Engagement Worldwide : A Comparative Study

By: Anduiza, Eva.
Contributor(s): Jensen, Michael James | Jorba, Laia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Communication, Society and Politics: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (306 p.).ISBN: 9781139422086.Subject(s): Communication in politics -- Technological innovations -- Cross-cultural studies | Internet -- Political aspects -- Cross-cultural studies | Political participation -- Technological innovations -- Cross-cultural studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Digital Media and Political Engagement Worldwide : A Comparative StudyDDC classification: 303.48 | 303.4833 LOC classification: JF799 .D56 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Digital Media and Political Engagement Worldwide: A Comparative Study; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Tables and Figures; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Digital Media and the Dimensions of Political Engagement; The Consequences of Digital Media for Political Engagement; The Rise of Online Engagement; Digital Media Use as a Predictor of Motivations, Attitudes, and Learning; Who Is Engaged through Digital Media?; The Role of Context in Digital Politics; The Choice of Cases and the Plan of the Book
1: The Impact of Digital Media on Citizenship from a Global Perspective1.1. Introduction; 1.2. The Digital Context and Citizenship; 1.3. From Studying Democratic Participation or Censorship to Studying Citizenship; 1.3.1. Digital Media and Political Attitudes; 1.3.2. Changing Political Practices; 1.3.3. Sociality of Politics; 1.4. From Studying Surveillance and Control to Citizenship: Problems from outside the Democratic Context; 1.4.1. The Possibility of Voice; 1.4.2. Allegiance, Identities, and Transnational Citizenship; 1.5. Conclusion
2: Recent Shifts in the Relationship between the Internet and Democratic Engagement in Britain and the United States: Granularity, Informational Exuberance, and Political Learning2.1. Introduction; 2.2. Web 2.0, Granularity, and Informational Exuberance; 2.3. Information, Learning, and Engagement; 2.4. Some Recent Shifts in the U.S. and British Literature; 2.4.1. Analytical and Methodological Uncertainty; 2.4.2. The Abundance and Complexity of Information; 2.4.3. Revisionist Perspectives on Deliberation; 2.5. Web 1.0 to Web 2.0: Three Arguments on the Transition
2.6. Granularity in Web 2.0 Politics2.7. Informational Exuberance and Political Learning in Web 2.0 Politics; 2.8. Conclusion; 3: Political Engagement and the Internet in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Elections: A Panel Survey; 3.1. Introduction; 3.2. Digital Democracy and Political Participation; 3.3. Accidental Online Political Mobilization; 3.4. Hypotheses; 3.5. Data and Methods; 3.6. Findings; 3.6.1. Who Changed Their Use of Online Political Information during the Campaign?; 3.6.2. Does Change in Online Political Engagement Predict Change in Levels of Political Interest?
3.6.3. Does Change in Online Political Engagement Predict Offline Political Participation?3.7. Conclusion; 3.8. Appendix; 4: Online Political Participation in the United States and Spain; 4.1. Introduction; 4.2. Digital Media Use and Political Participation; 4.3. The Cases; 4.4. Participation in Spain and the United States; 4.5. Conclusion; 4.6. Appendix; 5: Internet Use and Political Attitudes in Europe; 5.1. Introduction; 5.2. Political Attitudes and Digital Media; 5.3. Internet Use and Political Attitudes in Europe
5.4. Internet Use, Interest in Politics, and Internal Political Efficacy in Spain
Summary: Explores how digital media use affects political behavior and how this relationship is shaped by political environments across countries.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JF799 .D56 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=907165 Available EBL907165

Cover; Digital Media and Political Engagement Worldwide: A Comparative Study; Series; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Tables and Figures; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Digital Media and the Dimensions of Political Engagement; The Consequences of Digital Media for Political Engagement; The Rise of Online Engagement; Digital Media Use as a Predictor of Motivations, Attitudes, and Learning; Who Is Engaged through Digital Media?; The Role of Context in Digital Politics; The Choice of Cases and the Plan of the Book

1: The Impact of Digital Media on Citizenship from a Global Perspective1.1. Introduction; 1.2. The Digital Context and Citizenship; 1.3. From Studying Democratic Participation or Censorship to Studying Citizenship; 1.3.1. Digital Media and Political Attitudes; 1.3.2. Changing Political Practices; 1.3.3. Sociality of Politics; 1.4. From Studying Surveillance and Control to Citizenship: Problems from outside the Democratic Context; 1.4.1. The Possibility of Voice; 1.4.2. Allegiance, Identities, and Transnational Citizenship; 1.5. Conclusion

2: Recent Shifts in the Relationship between the Internet and Democratic Engagement in Britain and the United States: Granularity, Informational Exuberance, and Political Learning2.1. Introduction; 2.2. Web 2.0, Granularity, and Informational Exuberance; 2.3. Information, Learning, and Engagement; 2.4. Some Recent Shifts in the U.S. and British Literature; 2.4.1. Analytical and Methodological Uncertainty; 2.4.2. The Abundance and Complexity of Information; 2.4.3. Revisionist Perspectives on Deliberation; 2.5. Web 1.0 to Web 2.0: Three Arguments on the Transition

2.6. Granularity in Web 2.0 Politics2.7. Informational Exuberance and Political Learning in Web 2.0 Politics; 2.8. Conclusion; 3: Political Engagement and the Internet in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Elections: A Panel Survey; 3.1. Introduction; 3.2. Digital Democracy and Political Participation; 3.3. Accidental Online Political Mobilization; 3.4. Hypotheses; 3.5. Data and Methods; 3.6. Findings; 3.6.1. Who Changed Their Use of Online Political Information during the Campaign?; 3.6.2. Does Change in Online Political Engagement Predict Change in Levels of Political Interest?

3.6.3. Does Change in Online Political Engagement Predict Offline Political Participation?3.7. Conclusion; 3.8. Appendix; 4: Online Political Participation in the United States and Spain; 4.1. Introduction; 4.2. Digital Media Use and Political Participation; 4.3. The Cases; 4.4. Participation in Spain and the United States; 4.5. Conclusion; 4.6. Appendix; 5: Internet Use and Political Attitudes in Europe; 5.1. Introduction; 5.2. Political Attitudes and Digital Media; 5.3. Internet Use and Political Attitudes in Europe

5.4. Internet Use, Interest in Politics, and Internal Political Efficacy in Spain

Explores how digital media use affects political behavior and how this relationship is shaped by political environments across countries.

Description based upon print version of record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.