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The Liberal State on Trial : The Cold War and American Politics in the Truman Years

By: Bell, Jonathan.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (409 p.).ISBN: 9780231508308.Subject(s): United States - Foreign relations - 1945-1953 | United States - Politics and government - 1945-1953 | United States - Social policyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Liberal State on Trial : The Cold War and American Politics in the Truman YearsDDC classification: 973.918 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. THE DYNAMICS OF POSTWAR POLITICS BEFORE THE COLD WAR; 2. THE 80TH CONGRESS AND CONCEPTIONS OF THE STATE; 3. IDEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF FOREIGN POLICY 1947-1948; 4. VARIETIES OF LIBERALISM IN THE 1948 CAMPAIGNS; 5. TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES AND IMAGES OF THE STATE, 1949-1950; 6. THE AMERICAN STATE ON TRIAL: THE 1950 MIDTERM ELECTIONS; 7. ALL INTERNATIONALISTS NOW:; CONCLUSION; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
Summary: What was left, in both senses of the word, of liberalism after the death of Franklin Roosevelt? This question has aroused considerable historical debate because it raises the question of why the United States, during the Truman years, developed a much less state-centered orthodoxy than other comparable, powerful liberal states. What were the consequences of this fundamental choice that would shape the character and direction of American society during the second half of the twentieth century? This book explores the role of the Cold War in shifting the center of gravity in American poli
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E813.B44 2 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=909324 Available EBL909324

CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. THE DYNAMICS OF POSTWAR POLITICS BEFORE THE COLD WAR; 2. THE 80TH CONGRESS AND CONCEPTIONS OF THE STATE; 3. IDEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF FOREIGN POLICY 1947-1948; 4. VARIETIES OF LIBERALISM IN THE 1948 CAMPAIGNS; 5. TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES AND IMAGES OF THE STATE, 1949-1950; 6. THE AMERICAN STATE ON TRIAL: THE 1950 MIDTERM ELECTIONS; 7. ALL INTERNATIONALISTS NOW:; CONCLUSION; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX

What was left, in both senses of the word, of liberalism after the death of Franklin Roosevelt? This question has aroused considerable historical debate because it raises the question of why the United States, during the Truman years, developed a much less state-centered orthodoxy than other comparable, powerful liberal states. What were the consequences of this fundamental choice that would shape the character and direction of American society during the second half of the twentieth century? This book explores the role of the Cold War in shifting the center of gravity in American poli

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Challenging historians who claim that New Deal liberalism suffered a fatal blow from an anti-statist backlash in 1938, Bell (Univ. of Reading) argues that substantial sentiment for social democratic reform existed in the early postwar period. The country was at a crossroads, with social democrats on one side and anti-statists on the other. The war had accelerated state control of the economy and liberals saw an opportunity to institutionalize long-range planning and go beyond the reforms of the Second New Deal. But the emerging Cold War mandated that liberals distinguish themselves from the radical left, and this, coupled with their commitment to a bipartisan foreign policy, served to limit reform. To illustrate his points, Bell studies national and local political campaigns from 1946 to 1952, following the careers of democratic liberals such as Helen Gahagan Douglas and Claude Pepper. He also examines the conflicting foreign policy approaches that contended for primacy under Truman and compares the US mindset to that of the British. Although the detail is occasionally overwhelming, Bells makes a convincing case that will influence historians' interpretations of the political implications of the early Cold War. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All academic levels. L. M. Lees Old Dominion University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jonathan Bell is a lecturer in U.S. History at the University of Reading, England.

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