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Still the Arena of Civil War : Violence and Turmoil in Reconstruction Texas, 1865-1874

By: Howell, Kenneth W.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Denton : University of North Texas Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (458 p.).ISBN: 9781574414578.Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- Texas | Minorities -- Violence against -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- Texas | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Texas -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Violence -- Texas -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Still the Arena of Civil War : Violence and Turmoil in Reconstruction Texas, 1865-1874DDC classification: 976.4 | 976.406 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of Maps and Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part One; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 6; Part 2; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Part 3; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Chapter 12; Part 4; Chapter 13; Chapter 14; Chapter 15; List of Contributors; Index
Summary: Following the Civil War, the United States was fully engaged in a bloody conflict with ex-Confederates, conservative Democrats, and members of organized terrorist groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan, for control of the southern states. Texas became one of the earliest battleground states in the War of Reconstruction. Was the Reconstruction era in the Lone Star State simply a continuation of the Civil War? Evidence presented by sixteen contributors in this new anthology, edited by Kenneth W. Howell, argues that this indeed was the case. Topics include the role of the Freedmen's Bureau and the occ
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F391 .S855 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=912441 Available EBL912441

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of Maps and Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part One; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 6; Part 2; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Part 3; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Chapter 12; Part 4; Chapter 13; Chapter 14; Chapter 15; List of Contributors; Index

Following the Civil War, the United States was fully engaged in a bloody conflict with ex-Confederates, conservative Democrats, and members of organized terrorist groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan, for control of the southern states. Texas became one of the earliest battleground states in the War of Reconstruction. Was the Reconstruction era in the Lone Star State simply a continuation of the Civil War? Evidence presented by sixteen contributors in this new anthology, edited by Kenneth W. Howell, argues that this indeed was the case. Topics include the role of the Freedmen's Bureau and the occ

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Reconstruction in Texas has the reputation of being more violent than it was in other former Confederate states. Editor Howell acknowledges unique aspects of Texas as a frontier and border state that added to the violence but argues that violence was essential to white resistance to Reconstruction in both Texas and the rest of the South. The essays explore the complexities of post-Civil War violence in Texas. Whites attacked blacks; white Republicans, Northerners, and soldiers were targets of violence; and white and Mexican residents were in conflict in southern Texas. Howell views this violence as the second phase of the Civil War, a ten-year struggle following Appomattox during which Southerners regained control of their state governments and reestablished segregated social institutions that subjected blacks politically and economically. Topics covered include the "representatives of change" (the military, government agents, and law enforcement officers who attempted to enforce Reconstruction), the role of the Klan and other terrorist organizations, the victims of violence, and the geographic and chronological distribution of violence. As with most essay collections, there is some unevenness and overlap, but together, the essays provide a compelling, nuanced examination of the nature of the racial and political violence that characterized Reconstruction Texas. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. C. D. Wintz Texas Southern University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kenneth W. Howell is an assistant professor at Prairie View A&M University. He received his Ph.D. in history from Texas A&M University and also taught there as a visiting assistant professor. He is the author of Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb Throckmorton and coauthor of The Devil's Triangle: Ben Bickerstaff, Northeast Texans, and the War of Reconstruction in Texas and Beyond Myths and Legends: A Narrative History of Texas. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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