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The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes.

By: Donaldson, Ken.
Contributor(s): Poland, Craig | Duffin, Rodger | Bonner, James.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (258 p.).ISBN: 9781139516679.Subject(s): Carbon -- Biocompatibility | Carbon -- Toxicology | Nanoparticles -- Toxicology | Nanotubes -- Carbon content | Nanotubes -- ToxicologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Toxicology of Carbon NanotubesDDC classification: 572 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; THE TOXICOLOGY OF CARBON NANOTUBES; Title; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; 1 Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis, and applications; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Structure of carbon nanotubes; 1.3 Synthesis of carbon nanotubes; 1.3.1 Electric arc discharge; 1.3.2 Laser ablation; 1.3.3 Chemical vapour deposition; 1.3.3.1 Synthesis of MWCNTs; 1.3.3.2 Synthesis of SWCNTs; 1.4 Purification of carbon nanotubes; 1.5 Properties of carbon nanotubes; 1.5.1 Mechanical properties; 1.5.2 Electronic properties; 1.6 Applications of carbon nanotubes; 1.6.1 Carbon nanotube composites
1.6.2 Electronic devicesScanning probe microscope tips; Field-emission devices (FED); Transistors and optoelectronic devices; Carbon nanotube electrodes; 1.6.3 Hydrogen storage; 1.7 Biomedical applications; 1.7.1 Drug delivery and imaging; 1.7.2 Scaffolds for tissue regeneration; 1.7.3 Bioelectronics, biosensors, and medical devices; 1.8 Safety and future development; References; 2 The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Carbon nanotube aerosol particle morphology; 2.3 Mechanisms of particle deposition in the lung
2.4 Deposition efficiency of carbon nanotubes in the respiratory tract2.5 Summary and research needs; References; 3: Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes; 3.1 Structure, toxicity, and the biologically effective dose; 3.2 Nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes; 3.2.1 Biologically effective dose and structure-toxicity relationships in particle toxicology; 3.2.2 CNT as particles or fibres; 3.2.3 CNT as particles; 3.2.4 CNT as fibres; 3.3 Conclusion; Acknowledgement; References
4: CNT biopersistence and the fibre paradigm4.1 Fibre toxicology primer; 4.2 Fibre dimensions; 4.3 Lung fibre biopersistence; 4.4 Surface chemistry; 4.5 Conclusions regarding the fibre pathogenicity structure: activity paradigm and the possible relevance for exposure to carbon nanotubes; 4.6 Review of the current literature on longer-term inhalation studies with multi-walled forms of carbon nanotubes; 4.7 Potential for translocation of inhaled MWCNTs; 4.7.1 Physicochemical characteristics; 4.7.2 Potential cardiovascular effects; 4.7.3 Potential pleural effects; References
5: Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space5.1 Introduction; 5.2 The pleura structure and function; 5.2.1 The pleural space; 5.2.2 Fibressociated pleural disease; 5.3 Particle translocation; 5.3.1 Particle transit to the pleura; 5.4 Particle effects: retention in the pleural cavity; 5.5 Conclusions; References; 6: Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres; 6.1 Possible mechanisms of fibre carcinogenicity; 6.2 Carcinogenicity testing of fibrous materials; 6.3 Current testing strategy for fibrous particles
6.4 Available carcinogenicity studies on carbon nanotubes
Summary: The first book on this subject, invaluable to researchers and professionals involved with toxicology, risk assessment and nanotube physics.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA1270.N36 T69 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=944717 Available EBL944717

Cover; THE TOXICOLOGY OF CARBON NANOTUBES; Title; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; 1 Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis, and applications; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Structure of carbon nanotubes; 1.3 Synthesis of carbon nanotubes; 1.3.1 Electric arc discharge; 1.3.2 Laser ablation; 1.3.3 Chemical vapour deposition; 1.3.3.1 Synthesis of MWCNTs; 1.3.3.2 Synthesis of SWCNTs; 1.4 Purification of carbon nanotubes; 1.5 Properties of carbon nanotubes; 1.5.1 Mechanical properties; 1.5.2 Electronic properties; 1.6 Applications of carbon nanotubes; 1.6.1 Carbon nanotube composites

1.6.2 Electronic devicesScanning probe microscope tips; Field-emission devices (FED); Transistors and optoelectronic devices; Carbon nanotube electrodes; 1.6.3 Hydrogen storage; 1.7 Biomedical applications; 1.7.1 Drug delivery and imaging; 1.7.2 Scaffolds for tissue regeneration; 1.7.3 Bioelectronics, biosensors, and medical devices; 1.8 Safety and future development; References; 2 The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Carbon nanotube aerosol particle morphology; 2.3 Mechanisms of particle deposition in the lung

2.4 Deposition efficiency of carbon nanotubes in the respiratory tract2.5 Summary and research needs; References; 3: Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes; 3.1 Structure, toxicity, and the biologically effective dose; 3.2 Nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes; 3.2.1 Biologically effective dose and structure-toxicity relationships in particle toxicology; 3.2.2 CNT as particles or fibres; 3.2.3 CNT as particles; 3.2.4 CNT as fibres; 3.3 Conclusion; Acknowledgement; References

4: CNT biopersistence and the fibre paradigm4.1 Fibre toxicology primer; 4.2 Fibre dimensions; 4.3 Lung fibre biopersistence; 4.4 Surface chemistry; 4.5 Conclusions regarding the fibre pathogenicity structure: activity paradigm and the possible relevance for exposure to carbon nanotubes; 4.6 Review of the current literature on longer-term inhalation studies with multi-walled forms of carbon nanotubes; 4.7 Potential for translocation of inhaled MWCNTs; 4.7.1 Physicochemical characteristics; 4.7.2 Potential cardiovascular effects; 4.7.3 Potential pleural effects; References

5: Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space5.1 Introduction; 5.2 The pleura structure and function; 5.2.1 The pleural space; 5.2.2 Fibressociated pleural disease; 5.3 Particle translocation; 5.3.1 Particle transit to the pleura; 5.4 Particle effects: retention in the pleural cavity; 5.5 Conclusions; References; 6: Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres; 6.1 Possible mechanisms of fibre carcinogenicity; 6.2 Carcinogenicity testing of fibrous materials; 6.3 Current testing strategy for fibrous particles

6.4 Available carcinogenicity studies on carbon nanotubes

The first book on this subject, invaluable to researchers and professionals involved with toxicology, risk assessment and nanotube physics.

Description based upon print version of record.

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