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Challenging Authoritarianism in Mexico : Revolutionary Struggles and the Dirty War, 1964-1982

By: Calderon, Fernando Herrera.
Contributor(s): Cedillo, Adela.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2012Description: 1 online resource (248 p.).ISBN: 9780203133224.Subject(s): Guerrillas - Mexico - History - 20th century | Guerrillas -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | Mexico - Politics and government - 1946-1970 | Mexico - Politics and government - 1970-1988 | Partido Revolucionario Institucional -- History -- 20th century | Peasant uprisings - Mexico - History - 20th century | Political violence - Mexico - History - 20th century | Revolutionaries - Mexico - History - 20th century | Revolutionaries -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | Social movements - Mexico - History - 20th century | Social movements -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | State-sponsored terrorism - Mexico - History - 20th century | Student movements - Mexico - History - 20th century | Student movements -- Mexico -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Challenging Authoritarianism in Mexico : Revolutionary Struggles and the Dirty War, 1964-1982DDC classification: 972.08/2 | 972.082 | 972.083 LOC classification: F1236 .C47 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Chalenging Authoritarianism in Mexico; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Acronyms and Glossary; Preface: Héctor Guillermo Robles Garnica; Introduction: The Unknown Mexican Dirty War: Fernando Herrera Calderón and Adela Cedillo; 1. Madera 1965: Primeros Vientos: Elizabeth Henson; 2. Seizing Hold of Memories in Moments of Danger: Guerrillas and Revolution in Guerrero, Mexico: Alexander Aviña; 3. In the Vanguard of the Revolution: The Revolutionary Action Movement and the Armed Struggle: Verónica Oikión Solano
4. "Por la reunificación de los Pueblos Libres de América en su Lucha por el Socialismo": The Chicana/o Movement, the PPUA and the Dirty War in Mexico in the 1970s: Alan Eladio Gómez5. From Books to Bullets: Youth Radicalism and Urban Guerrillas in Guadalajara: Fernando Herrera Calderón; 6. A Revolutionary Group Fighting Against a Revolutionary State: The September 23rd Communist League Against the PRI-State (1973-1975): Romain Robinet
7. Armed Struggle Without Revolution: The Organizing Process of the National Liberation Forces (FLN) and the Genesis of Neo-Zapatism (1969-1983): Adela Cedillo8. Subjugating the Nation: Women and the Guerrilla Experience: Lucía Rayas; 9. Armed Forces and Counterinsurgency: Origins of the Dirty War (1965-1982): Jorge Luis Sierra Guzmán; 10. Transcending Violence: A Crisis of Memory and Documentation: Elaine Carey; Contributors; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The Cold War in Latin America spawned numerous authoritarian and military regimes in response to the ostensible threat of communism in the Western Hemisphere, and with that, a rigid national security doctrine was exported to Latin America by the United States. Between 1964 and 1985, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uraguay experienced a period of state-sponsored terrorism commonly referred to as the ""dirty wars."" Thousands of leftists, students, intellectuals, workers, peasants, labor leaders, and innocent civilians were harassed, arrested, tortured, raped, murdered, or 'di
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1236 .C47 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=957395 Available EBL957395

Front Cover; Chalenging Authoritarianism in Mexico; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Acronyms and Glossary; Preface: Héctor Guillermo Robles Garnica; Introduction: The Unknown Mexican Dirty War: Fernando Herrera Calderón and Adela Cedillo; 1. Madera 1965: Primeros Vientos: Elizabeth Henson; 2. Seizing Hold of Memories in Moments of Danger: Guerrillas and Revolution in Guerrero, Mexico: Alexander Aviña; 3. In the Vanguard of the Revolution: The Revolutionary Action Movement and the Armed Struggle: Verónica Oikión Solano

4. "Por la reunificación de los Pueblos Libres de América en su Lucha por el Socialismo": The Chicana/o Movement, the PPUA and the Dirty War in Mexico in the 1970s: Alan Eladio Gómez5. From Books to Bullets: Youth Radicalism and Urban Guerrillas in Guadalajara: Fernando Herrera Calderón; 6. A Revolutionary Group Fighting Against a Revolutionary State: The September 23rd Communist League Against the PRI-State (1973-1975): Romain Robinet

7. Armed Struggle Without Revolution: The Organizing Process of the National Liberation Forces (FLN) and the Genesis of Neo-Zapatism (1969-1983): Adela Cedillo8. Subjugating the Nation: Women and the Guerrilla Experience: Lucía Rayas; 9. Armed Forces and Counterinsurgency: Origins of the Dirty War (1965-1982): Jorge Luis Sierra Guzmán; 10. Transcending Violence: A Crisis of Memory and Documentation: Elaine Carey; Contributors; Bibliography; Index

The Cold War in Latin America spawned numerous authoritarian and military regimes in response to the ostensible threat of communism in the Western Hemisphere, and with that, a rigid national security doctrine was exported to Latin America by the United States. Between 1964 and 1985, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uraguay experienced a period of state-sponsored terrorism commonly referred to as the ""dirty wars."" Thousands of leftists, students, intellectuals, workers, peasants, labor leaders, and innocent civilians were harassed, arrested, tortured, raped, murdered, or 'di

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The essays in this collection provide an important contribution to the literature analyzing Mexico's experience with "dirty wars," phenomena that have been more commonly associated with Argentina and Chile. Through a collection of ten impressively researched and well-written essays, the editors use case studies to evaluate the various ways regional revolutionary movements attempted to fulfill the failed goals of Mexico's 1910 revolution, and how the state developed the tools to systematically thwart these efforts. Through this analysis of unattained revolutionary goals and the repressive response by the state, the contributors provide important commentary on the Cold War, Mexico's human rights, gender history, and student radical behavior. Consistent throughout the essays is the view that most of the radical revolutionary attempts were flawed from the outset, yet Mexico employed broad instruments of terror to discredit these movements, including torture, rape, murder, arrest, and disappearances. As the contributing authors collectively argue, it was the breadth and brutality of Mexico's response that challenges the long-held idea that Mexico's dirty war was not as bad as those of its Latin American neighbors in the late 20th century. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, and professional historians. J. B. Kirkwood Colby-Sawyer College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Fernando Herrera Calderón is Visiting Assistant Professor at Beloit College.</p> <p>Adela Cedillo is a graduate student in Latin American Studies at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She's the author of El fuego y el silencio: Historia de las Fuerzas de Liberacion Nacional de Mexico (1969-1974), the first comprehensive history on the organization that gave birth to the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN).</p>

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