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An Absolute Massacre : The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866

By: Hollandsworth, James G. Jr.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2004Description: 1 online resource (187 p.).ISBN: 9780807151303.Subject(s): African Americans -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History -- 19th century | African Americans - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 19th century | Louisiana - Politics and government - 1865-1950 | New Orleans (La.) - History - 19th century | New Orleans (La.) -- History -- 19th century | New Orleans (La.) - Race relations | New Orleans (La.) -- Race relations | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) - Louisiana | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- Louisiana | Riots - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 19th century | Riots -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: An Absolute Massacre : The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866DDC classification: 976.334061 | 976.334064 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Give Us a Free State; 2 No Better Constitution; 3 There Is No Middle Ground; 4 We Are in Revolutionary Times; 5 Not More Than Half a Million Will Survive; 6 Please Instruct Me at Once by Telegram; 7 To-morrow Will Be the Bloodiest Day; 8 You Better Stay Home; 9 Go Away, You Black Son of a Bitch; 10 For God's Sake, Don't Shoot Us!; 11 Hurrah for Hell; 12 Can I Go Home?; 13 The Rebels Have Control Here; Postscript; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: In the summer of 1866, racial tensions ran high in Louisiana as a constitutional convention considered disenfranchising former Confederates and enfranchising blacks. On July 30, a procession of black suffrage supporters pushed through an angry throng of hostile whites. Words were exchanged, shots rang out, and within minutes a riot erupted with unrestrained fury. When it was over, at least forty-eight men-an overwhelming majority of them black-lay dead and more than two hundred had been wounded. In An Absolute Massacre, James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., examines the events surrounding the confronta
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F379.N557 H65 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=987399 Available EBL987399

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Give Us a Free State; 2 No Better Constitution; 3 There Is No Middle Ground; 4 We Are in Revolutionary Times; 5 Not More Than Half a Million Will Survive; 6 Please Instruct Me at Once by Telegram; 7 To-morrow Will Be the Bloodiest Day; 8 You Better Stay Home; 9 Go Away, You Black Son of a Bitch; 10 For God's Sake, Don't Shoot Us!; 11 Hurrah for Hell; 12 Can I Go Home?; 13 The Rebels Have Control Here; Postscript; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

In the summer of 1866, racial tensions ran high in Louisiana as a constitutional convention considered disenfranchising former Confederates and enfranchising blacks. On July 30, a procession of black suffrage supporters pushed through an angry throng of hostile whites. Words were exchanged, shots rang out, and within minutes a riot erupted with unrestrained fury. When it was over, at least forty-eight men-an overwhelming majority of them black-lay dead and more than two hundred had been wounded. In An Absolute Massacre, James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., examines the events surrounding the confronta

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

On July 30, 1866, New Orleans experienced one of the worst riots in the urban history of the nation. Its causes centered on local animosities related to presidential reconstruction, namely the complex hatreds manifested between pro-Union sympathizers who favored enfranchising former slaves and ex-Confederates who supported white supremacy. A group of Unionists reconvened the state's constitutional convention in order to extend the franchise. When this happened, a group of blacks marched peacefully through the streets of New Orleans to the state capitol building, then located in that city, to show their support. Angry southern whites, aided by sympathetic members of the police force, attacked the marchers, sparking a citywide riot during which over 40 persons lost their lives, including members of the convention who died when the mob attacked the capitol building. Based on a considerable amount of eyewitness testimony, this book cogently and concisely examines the causes of the riot and provides a compelling step-by-step narrative of the carnage that occurred during its course. Hollandsworth sets the riot fully in its context and provides a valuable assessment of its role in motivating congressional reconstruction throughout the entire ex-Confederacy. All collections. L. T. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., is also the author of The Louisiana Native Guards: The Black Military Experience during the Civil War and Pretense of Glory: The Life of Nathaniel P. Banks.He lives in Jackson, Mississippi.</p>

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