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The Louisiana Native Guards : The Black Military Experience During the Civil War

By: Hollandsworth, James G. Jr.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 1995Description: 1 online resource (169 p.).ISBN: 9780807141342.Subject(s): African American soldiers - Louisiana - History - 19th century | African American soldiers -- Louisiana -- History -- 19th century | Louisiana - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Participation, African American | Louisiana -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, African American | Louisiana - Militia - History - 19th century | Louisiana -- Militia -- History -- 19th century | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Participation, African American | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, African AmericanGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Louisiana Native Guards : The Black Military Experience During the Civil WarDDC classification: 973.7/415/09763 | 973.741509763 | 973.7463 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1 Defenders of the Native Land; 2 Great Pride in the Business; 3 Woe to Any Man Who Flinches; 4 When Tried, They Will Not Be Found Wanting; 5 I Regard It as an Experiment; 6 The Equal of Any ""Yankee Troops"" You Will Find; 7 Unsuited for This Duty; 8 We Shall Eventually Come Out Ahead; 9 Diggers and Drudges; 10 Manhood of the Colored Race; Appendix: Black Officers in the Native Guards; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W
Summary: Early in the Civil War, Louisiana's Confederate government sanctioned a militia unit of black troops, the Louisiana Native Guards. Intended as a response to demands from members of New Orleans' substantial free black population that they be permitted to participate in the defense of their state, the unit was used by Confederate authorities for public display and propaganda purposes but was not allowed to fight. After the fall of New Orleans, General Benjamin F. Butler brought the Native Guards into Federal military service and increased their numbers with runaway slaves. He intended to use the
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E540.N3 H65 1995 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=987408 Available EBL987408

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1 Defenders of the Native Land; 2 Great Pride in the Business; 3 Woe to Any Man Who Flinches; 4 When Tried, They Will Not Be Found Wanting; 5 I Regard It as an Experiment; 6 The Equal of Any ""Yankee Troops"" You Will Find; 7 Unsuited for This Duty; 8 We Shall Eventually Come Out Ahead; 9 Diggers and Drudges; 10 Manhood of the Colored Race; Appendix: Black Officers in the Native Guards; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W

Early in the Civil War, Louisiana's Confederate government sanctioned a militia unit of black troops, the Louisiana Native Guards. Intended as a response to demands from members of New Orleans' substantial free black population that they be permitted to participate in the defense of their state, the unit was used by Confederate authorities for public display and propaganda purposes but was not allowed to fight. After the fall of New Orleans, General Benjamin F. Butler brought the Native Guards into Federal military service and increased their numbers with runaway slaves. He intended to use the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In 1861 members of New Orleans' free African American community formed a regiment to defend Confederate Louisiana. Never fully armed and used primarily for Southern propaganda, the Native Guards reemerged, after the occupation of New Orleans by Union forces in 1862, as a Union unit. Augmented by former slaves, they fought at Port Hudson, demonstrating their courage, if not the wisdom of their commanding officers. Much of Hollandsworth's story, however, is one of grim endurance of persecution both inside and outside the army. This is the first book devoted exclusively to the Native Guards, although lengthy periodical articles about them exist. Hollandsworth (psychology, Univ. of Southern Mississippi) is primarily interested in providing an accurate account of the group and suggesting that service in the Guards led to postwar involvement in politics. The brief text is supplemented by a list of African American officers who served in the Guards and their fate in service. The lack of development of broader themes or contexts makes this study primarily of interest to specialists. Recommended for graduate-level collections in Louisiana, African American, or Civil War history. P. F. Field Ohio University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., associate provost and lecturer in history at the University of Southern Mississippi, is the author of Pretense of Glory: The Life of General Nathaniel P. Banks and An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866.</p> <p>James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., associate provost and lecturer in history at the University of Southern Mississippi, is the author of Pretense of Glory: The Life of General Nathaniel P. Banks and An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866.</p>

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