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A Cold War Turning Point : Nixon and China, 1969-1972

By: Tudda, Chris.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (303 p.).ISBN: 9780807142905.Subject(s): China - Foreign relations - United States | China -- Foreign relations -- United States | Cold War - Diplomatic history | Cold war - Diplomatic history | Cold War -- Diplomatic history | Nixon, Richard M | Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994 | United States - Foreign relations - 1969-1974 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1969-1974 | United States - Foreign relations - China | United States -- Foreign relations -- ChinaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Cold War Turning Point : Nixon and China, 1969-1972DDC classification: 973.924 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; CONTENTS; PREFACE; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS; 1 Nixon Pushes Rapprochement; 2 A New Mood in Beijing; 3 Tentative Steps and the Warsaw Channel; 4 The Post-Cambodia Chill and the Pakistani Channel; Illustrations; 5 Kissinger's Secret Trip to Beijing; 6 Reassuring Allies and Pursuing the Moscow Summit; 7 Chinese at the UN and Kissinger's Second Visit to Beijing; 8 Sino-U.S. Rapprochement and the Indo-Pakistani Crisis; 9 Homestretch to the Beijing Summit; 10 The Beijing Summit; 11 Conclusion; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S
TU; V; W; X; Y; Z
Summary: In February 1972 President Nixon arrived in Beijing for what Chairman Mao Zedong called the "week that changed the world." Using recently declassified sources from American, Chinese, European, and Soviet archives, Chris Tudda's A Cold War Turning Point reveals new details about the relationship forged by Nixon's administration and the Chinese government that dramatically altered the trajectory of the Cold War.The first book to use the Nixon tapes and Kissinger Telephone Conversations to illustrate the complexity of early Sino-U.S. relations, Tudda's thorough and illuminating research provides
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E183.8.C6 T84 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=987415 Available EBL987415

Cover; CONTENTS; PREFACE; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS; 1 Nixon Pushes Rapprochement; 2 A New Mood in Beijing; 3 Tentative Steps and the Warsaw Channel; 4 The Post-Cambodia Chill and the Pakistani Channel; Illustrations; 5 Kissinger's Secret Trip to Beijing; 6 Reassuring Allies and Pursuing the Moscow Summit; 7 Chinese at the UN and Kissinger's Second Visit to Beijing; 8 Sino-U.S. Rapprochement and the Indo-Pakistani Crisis; 9 Homestretch to the Beijing Summit; 10 The Beijing Summit; 11 Conclusion; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S

TU; V; W; X; Y; Z

In February 1972 President Nixon arrived in Beijing for what Chairman Mao Zedong called the "week that changed the world." Using recently declassified sources from American, Chinese, European, and Soviet archives, Chris Tudda's A Cold War Turning Point reveals new details about the relationship forged by Nixon's administration and the Chinese government that dramatically altered the trajectory of the Cold War.The first book to use the Nixon tapes and Kissinger Telephone Conversations to illustrate the complexity of early Sino-U.S. relations, Tudda's thorough and illuminating research provides

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Tudda, a historian with the US Department of State, has produced a fine work on President Nixon's rapprochement with the People's Republic of China (PRC). Relying on recently declassified documentary evidence from both US and international archives, including extensive use of the White House tapes, Tudda describes Nixon's bold decision to begin normalizing relations with communist China and its impact on the latter stages of the Cold War. Praising Nixon's foreign policy realism, the author argues that the president demonstrated a great deal of foresight and courage in recognizing the need to alter Washington's decades-old policy of ignoring the PRC, even though he knew he would face withering criticism from the conservative Right. Tudda also vividly recounts the administration's shortcomings, detailing how the rivalry between the State Department and the National Security Council and Nixon's failure to manage the tension hampered the creation of a more coherent policy. International sources indicate that the PRC, specifically Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, welcomed rapprochement as a way for the PRC to take its rightful place as one of the major players on the world stage. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers/faculty. C. G. Frentzos Austin Peay State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Chris Tudda has been a historian in the Declassification and Publishing Division of the Office of the Historian, Department of State, since 2003. He is the author of The Truth Is Our Weapon: The Rhetorical Diplomacy of Dwight D. Eisenhower and John Foster Dulles.</p>

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