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Waves of War : Nationalism, State Formation, and Ethnic Exclusion in the Modern World

By: Wimmer, Andreas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (346 p.).ISBN: 9781139552479.Subject(s): Ethnic groups -- Political activity -- History -- 20th century | Nationalism -- History -- 20th century | Nation-state -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Waves of War : Nationalism, State Formation, and Ethnic Exclusion in the Modern WorldDDC classification: 320.5409/04 | 320.540904 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
cover.pdf; Waves of War; Title; Copyright; Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction and summary; 1 The narrative in a nutshell and the moral of the tale; 2 Main contributions; 2.1 Bringing power and legitimacy center stage; 2.2 New data to answer old questions; 3 Four methodological principles; 4 On theory: networks, institutions, power; 4.1 Political alliances and identities; 4.2 Principles of legitimacy; 4.3 Power configurations and conflict; 5 The rise and spread of the nation-state; 5.1 Negotiating nationhood; 5.2 The global rise of the nation-state
6 Nation-states and violence6.1 Nation-state formation and war; 6.2 Ethnic politics and armed conflict; 6.3 Can peace be engineered?; 7 Limitations and implications; 2 The birth of the nation; 1 Modeling strategy; 2 A game-theoretic exchange model; 2.1 The basics: actors and alliance systems; 2.2 The model in a nutshell; 2.3 The exchange model in detail; 2.4 Considerations of cultural commonality; 2.5 The negotiation process in detail; 3 Hypotheses and empirical calibration; 3.1 Hypotheses; 3.2 Empirical calibration I: empire and strong scenario
3.3 Empirical calibration II: the weak scenario4 Results: strong and weak scenarios with well-developed civil societies; 5 The negotiation process under the magnifying glass; 5.1 Ethnic closure; 5.2 Negotiating nationhood; 5.3 The populist compromise; 6 When cultural traits matter; 7 Historical analogies: French nation building, Ottoman disintegration; 8 Summary and conclusions; 3 The global rise of the nation-state; 1 Hypotheses and existing quantitative studies; 1.1 Economic modernization; 1.2 Political modernization; 1.3 Cultural modernization; 1.4 World polity theory
1.5 A power-configurational approach1.6 Existing datasets and quantitative findings; 2 Dataset and modeling approach; 2.1 Units of observation; 2.2 Variables; Dependent variable; Independent variables; 2.3 Modeling approach and time specification; 3 Results; 3.1 Main findings; 3.2 Context and contingency; 4 Conclusions; 4 Nation-state formation and war; 1 Blind spots in conventional studies of war; 1.1 Nationalism and nation-state formation; 1.2 Long-term processes; 1.3 Beyond methodological nationalism; 1.4 Civil and inter-state wars
2 From empires to nation-states: an institutionalist argument2.1 Imperial expansion and nation-state formation, 1816-2001; 2.2 A long-term, institutionalist model of modern war; 2.3 Imperial incorporation and war; 2.4 Nation-state formation and war; 2.5 Summary: institutional transformations and war; 3 A new dataset; 3.1 Units of observation; 3.2 The war dataset; 4 Discovering the pattern: temporal variation in war rates; 4.1 Rates of war around the two transformations; 4.2 Rates of onset for different types of war; 5 Variables and hypotheses; 5.1 Testing the institutionalist model
5.2 Other independent variables
Summary: A new perspective on how the nation-state emerged and subsequently proliferated across the globe, accompanied by a wave of wars.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JC311 .W469 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=989189 Available EBL989189

cover.pdf; Waves of War; Title; Copyright; Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction and summary; 1 The narrative in a nutshell and the moral of the tale; 2 Main contributions; 2.1 Bringing power and legitimacy center stage; 2.2 New data to answer old questions; 3 Four methodological principles; 4 On theory: networks, institutions, power; 4.1 Political alliances and identities; 4.2 Principles of legitimacy; 4.3 Power configurations and conflict; 5 The rise and spread of the nation-state; 5.1 Negotiating nationhood; 5.2 The global rise of the nation-state

6 Nation-states and violence6.1 Nation-state formation and war; 6.2 Ethnic politics and armed conflict; 6.3 Can peace be engineered?; 7 Limitations and implications; 2 The birth of the nation; 1 Modeling strategy; 2 A game-theoretic exchange model; 2.1 The basics: actors and alliance systems; 2.2 The model in a nutshell; 2.3 The exchange model in detail; 2.4 Considerations of cultural commonality; 2.5 The negotiation process in detail; 3 Hypotheses and empirical calibration; 3.1 Hypotheses; 3.2 Empirical calibration I: empire and strong scenario

3.3 Empirical calibration II: the weak scenario4 Results: strong and weak scenarios with well-developed civil societies; 5 The negotiation process under the magnifying glass; 5.1 Ethnic closure; 5.2 Negotiating nationhood; 5.3 The populist compromise; 6 When cultural traits matter; 7 Historical analogies: French nation building, Ottoman disintegration; 8 Summary and conclusions; 3 The global rise of the nation-state; 1 Hypotheses and existing quantitative studies; 1.1 Economic modernization; 1.2 Political modernization; 1.3 Cultural modernization; 1.4 World polity theory

1.5 A power-configurational approach1.6 Existing datasets and quantitative findings; 2 Dataset and modeling approach; 2.1 Units of observation; 2.2 Variables; Dependent variable; Independent variables; 2.3 Modeling approach and time specification; 3 Results; 3.1 Main findings; 3.2 Context and contingency; 4 Conclusions; 4 Nation-state formation and war; 1 Blind spots in conventional studies of war; 1.1 Nationalism and nation-state formation; 1.2 Long-term processes; 1.3 Beyond methodological nationalism; 1.4 Civil and inter-state wars

2 From empires to nation-states: an institutionalist argument2.1 Imperial expansion and nation-state formation, 1816-2001; 2.2 A long-term, institutionalist model of modern war; 2.3 Imperial incorporation and war; 2.4 Nation-state formation and war; 2.5 Summary: institutional transformations and war; 3 A new dataset; 3.1 Units of observation; 3.2 The war dataset; 4 Discovering the pattern: temporal variation in war rates; 4.1 Rates of war around the two transformations; 4.2 Rates of onset for different types of war; 5 Variables and hypotheses; 5.1 Testing the institutionalist model

5.2 Other independent variables

A new perspective on how the nation-state emerged and subsequently proliferated across the globe, accompanied by a wave of wars.

Description based upon print version of record.

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