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The Maid Narratives : Black Domestics and White Families in the Jim Crow South

By: Wormer, Katherine Van.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Southern Literary Studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (317 p.).ISBN: 9780807149690.Subject(s): African American household employees - Southern States - History - 20th century | African American household employees - Southern States - History - 20th century | Southern States - Race relations - History - 20th century | Southern States - Race relations - History - 20th century | Southern States - Social conditions - 20th century | Southern States - Social conditions - 20th century | Southern States - Social life and customs - 20th century | Southern States - Social life and customs - 20th century | Women household employees - Southern States - History - 20th century | Women household employees - Southern States - History - 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Maid Narratives : Black Domestics and White Families in the Jim Crow SouthDDC classification: 331.48164089 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Notes from the Authors; Part I. The Background; 1. Introduction; 2. History and Context; 3. The Women of the Great Migration; Part II. The Maid Narratives; 4. In Their Own Words; "They didn't want no Negroes to have no freedom."; "I worked in the home of William Faulkner."; "The man didn't want me to wash my hands in the wash pan."; "My mother named me after her doll."; "I worked for white families as soon as I was old enough to walk."; "I wish to God I could tell you more, but it's too painful."
"I came from a little nobody to somebody.""'She's twelve years old; call her Miss Nancy.'"; "You never went in the front door."; "It's just the way we lived down South; nobody bothered anybody."; "I always thought that my brother might have been kin to them [the white family]."; "[My sister] told me, 'I would not only clean the bathroom but I'd take a bath in the bathtub.'"; "I always wanted to be a teacher."; 5. The Maid Narrative Themes; Part III. The White Family Narratives; 6. In Their Own Words; "It's just not done."
"I don't remember experiencing any tension or problem resulting from this custom.""Thanks for the memories."; "You have to talk to them, and really listen to them."; "It was what it was, and now is no more."; "To realize . . . that my family was a part of it was humiliating."; "Viola was my second mother."; "If only I had been able to appreciate her when I knew her as a child."; "I grew up during Freedom Summer."; "My story . . . has only one act."; "It remains a difficult topic to discuss in polite company."; "She remembered me as a small child."
"These photos have been in every kitchen I have ever had.""I wonder if May ever thought of us being spoiled."; "My parents were civil rights allies."; "My father was Native American."; 7. The White Family Narrative Themes; Epilogue; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: The Maid Narratives shares the memories of black domestic workers and the white families they served, uncovering the often intimate relationships between maid and mistress. Based on interviews with over fifty people-both white and black-these stories deliver a personal and powerful message about resilience and resistance in the face of oppression in the Jim Crow South.The housekeepers, caretakers, sharecroppers, and cooks who share their experiences in The Maid Narratives ultimately moved away during the Great Migration. Their perspectives as servants who left for better opportunities outside
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.61 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1025989 Available EBL1025989

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Notes from the Authors; Part I. The Background; 1. Introduction; 2. History and Context; 3. The Women of the Great Migration; Part II. The Maid Narratives; 4. In Their Own Words; "They didn't want no Negroes to have no freedom."; "I worked in the home of William Faulkner."; "The man didn't want me to wash my hands in the wash pan."; "My mother named me after her doll."; "I worked for white families as soon as I was old enough to walk."; "I wish to God I could tell you more, but it's too painful."

"I came from a little nobody to somebody.""'She's twelve years old; call her Miss Nancy.'"; "You never went in the front door."; "It's just the way we lived down South; nobody bothered anybody."; "I always thought that my brother might have been kin to them [the white family]."; "[My sister] told me, 'I would not only clean the bathroom but I'd take a bath in the bathtub.'"; "I always wanted to be a teacher."; 5. The Maid Narrative Themes; Part III. The White Family Narratives; 6. In Their Own Words; "It's just not done."

"I don't remember experiencing any tension or problem resulting from this custom.""Thanks for the memories."; "You have to talk to them, and really listen to them."; "It was what it was, and now is no more."; "To realize . . . that my family was a part of it was humiliating."; "Viola was my second mother."; "If only I had been able to appreciate her when I knew her as a child."; "I grew up during Freedom Summer."; "My story . . . has only one act."; "It remains a difficult topic to discuss in polite company."; "She remembered me as a small child."

"These photos have been in every kitchen I have ever had.""I wonder if May ever thought of us being spoiled."; "My parents were civil rights allies."; "My father was Native American."; 7. The White Family Narrative Themes; Epilogue; References; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; V; W; Y; Z

The Maid Narratives shares the memories of black domestic workers and the white families they served, uncovering the often intimate relationships between maid and mistress. Based on interviews with over fifty people-both white and black-these stories deliver a personal and powerful message about resilience and resistance in the face of oppression in the Jim Crow South.The housekeepers, caretakers, sharecroppers, and cooks who share their experiences in The Maid Narratives ultimately moved away during the Great Migration. Their perspectives as servants who left for better opportunities outside

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

During the last 25 years, a spate of books about the lives of black women who worked as domestics and who moved from the South to the North during the second Great Migration have appeared. A number are oral histories. The present book set out to be oral histories of black women who moved to Iowa (one-third of the book's content) and comments by white women, but the evidence also includes published works of fiction and biography and frequent comments on the recent book and movie The Help. This work is really a sociological and psychological analysis of the interactions of black and white women and the unspoken social boundaries that enforced southern racial relations. The authors are particularly interested in the wearing of uniforms, entering by the back door, where food was eaten, "toting" home gifts, the use of toilets, and names used. The pool of white respondents is limited to the lead author's acquaintances and emphasizes the white women's fantasies of love from their black servants and their blindness to the world of black women. A good addition to a still sparse literature. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. S. S. Arpad emerita, California State University, Fresno

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Charletta Sudduth is an early-childhood consultant for the Waterloo Community School District. She earned a master's in social work and a doctorate in education, curriculum, and instruction from the University of Northern Iowa.</p> <p>David W. Jackson III is assistant professor in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Metropolitan State College of Denver. He is co-producer of the oral video history project African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley. In 2006, he received the Trio Achiever of the Year award for the State of Iowa.</p> <p>Katherine van Wormer, who grew up in New Orleans, is a sociologist and professor of social work at the University of Northern Iowa. She is the author or coauthor of sixteen books, including Death by Domestic Violence; Human Behavior and the Social Environment; Confronting Oppression, Restoring Justice; and Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective.</p>

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