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Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon Technologies.

By: Jain, Vipul.
Contributor(s): Heydari, Payam.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2012Description: 1 online resource (101 p.).ISBN: 9781441967756.Subject(s): Adaptive signal processing | Automobiles -- Electronic equipment | Programmable controllers | RadarGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon TechnologiesDDC classification: 621.3848 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon Technologies; Preface; Contents; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Motivation; 1.2 Organization; 2 Radar Fundamentals; 2.1 Radar Architectures; 2.1.1 Continuous-Wave Radars; 2.1.1.1 Frequency Chirped Radars; 2.1.1.2 Pseudo-Random Noise Coded Radars; 2.1.2 Pulsed Radars; 2.2 Radar Range; 2.3 Range Resolution; 2.4 Doppler Frequency; 2.5 Signal-to-Noise Ratio; 2.6 The Radar Equation; 2.7 Pulse Compression; 3 Automotive Radars: System-Level Considerations; 3.1 Automotive Radar Spectra; 3.2 Ultra-Wideband Radar Architectures; 3.3 Radar System-Level Specifications
4 A 22-29-GHz UWB Pulse-Radar Receiver Front-End4.1 Receiver Architecture; 4.2 Circuit Design; 4.2.1 22-29-GHz UWB Neutralized LNA; 4.2.2 Quadrature Mixers and Baseband VGAs; 4.2.3 Pulse Formation; 4.3 Measurement Results; 4.4 Chapter Summary; 5 A BiCMOS Dual-Band Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer; 5.1 Dual-Band Architecture; 5.2 Circuit Design; 5.2.1 24-GHz and 77-GHz Voltage Controlled Oscillators; 5.2.2 Dual-Mode Injection-Locked Frequency Divider; 5.2.2.1 Mode 0: Free-Running Operation; 5.2.2.2 Mode I: Injection-Locked Oscillator; 5.2.2.3 Mode II: Injection-Locked Divide-by-Three
5.2.3 Divider Chain, PFDCP and Loop Filter5.3 Experimental Results; 5.4 Chapter Summary; 6 A Single-Chip Dual-Band 22-29-GHz77-81-GHz BiCMOS Transceiver; 6.1 Dual-Band Transceiver Architecture; 6.2 Transceiver Implementation; 6.2.1 Receiver; 6.2.2 Transmitter; 6.2.3 Dual-Band Frequency Synthesizer; 6.2.4 Baseband Pulse Generator; 6.3 Measurement Results; 6.4 Chapter Summary; 7 Conclusion; 7.1 Future Work; Bibliography
Summary: One of the leading causes of automobile accidents is the slow reaction of the driver while responding to a hazardous situation. State-of-the-art wireless electronics can automate several driving functions, leading to significant reduction in human error and improvement in vehicle safety. With continuous transistor scaling, silicon fabrication technology now has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of automotive radar sensors. This book bridges an existing gap between information available on dependable system/architecture design and circuit design. It provides the background of the f
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
TK6575 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1030856 Available EBL1030856

Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon Technologies; Preface; Contents; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Motivation; 1.2 Organization; 2 Radar Fundamentals; 2.1 Radar Architectures; 2.1.1 Continuous-Wave Radars; 2.1.1.1 Frequency Chirped Radars; 2.1.1.2 Pseudo-Random Noise Coded Radars; 2.1.2 Pulsed Radars; 2.2 Radar Range; 2.3 Range Resolution; 2.4 Doppler Frequency; 2.5 Signal-to-Noise Ratio; 2.6 The Radar Equation; 2.7 Pulse Compression; 3 Automotive Radars: System-Level Considerations; 3.1 Automotive Radar Spectra; 3.2 Ultra-Wideband Radar Architectures; 3.3 Radar System-Level Specifications

4 A 22-29-GHz UWB Pulse-Radar Receiver Front-End4.1 Receiver Architecture; 4.2 Circuit Design; 4.2.1 22-29-GHz UWB Neutralized LNA; 4.2.2 Quadrature Mixers and Baseband VGAs; 4.2.3 Pulse Formation; 4.3 Measurement Results; 4.4 Chapter Summary; 5 A BiCMOS Dual-Band Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer; 5.1 Dual-Band Architecture; 5.2 Circuit Design; 5.2.1 24-GHz and 77-GHz Voltage Controlled Oscillators; 5.2.2 Dual-Mode Injection-Locked Frequency Divider; 5.2.2.1 Mode 0: Free-Running Operation; 5.2.2.2 Mode I: Injection-Locked Oscillator; 5.2.2.3 Mode II: Injection-Locked Divide-by-Three

5.2.3 Divider Chain, PFDCP and Loop Filter5.3 Experimental Results; 5.4 Chapter Summary; 6 A Single-Chip Dual-Band 22-29-GHz77-81-GHz BiCMOS Transceiver; 6.1 Dual-Band Transceiver Architecture; 6.2 Transceiver Implementation; 6.2.1 Receiver; 6.2.2 Transmitter; 6.2.3 Dual-Band Frequency Synthesizer; 6.2.4 Baseband Pulse Generator; 6.3 Measurement Results; 6.4 Chapter Summary; 7 Conclusion; 7.1 Future Work; Bibliography

One of the leading causes of automobile accidents is the slow reaction of the driver while responding to a hazardous situation. State-of-the-art wireless electronics can automate several driving functions, leading to significant reduction in human error and improvement in vehicle safety. With continuous transistor scaling, silicon fabrication technology now has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of automotive radar sensors. This book bridges an existing gap between information available on dependable system/architecture design and circuit design. It provides the background of the f

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