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The Archaeology of the Caddo.

By: Perttula, Timothy K.
Contributor(s): Walker, Chester P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lincoln : UNP - Nebraska Paperback, 2012Description: 1 online resource (535 p.).ISBN: 9780803240469.Subject(s): Caddo Indians -- Antiquities | Caddo Indians -- History | Caddo Indians -- Social life and customs | Excavations (Archaeology) -- Great PlainsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Archaeology of the CaddoDDC classification: 976.0049793 LOC classification: E99.C12Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright page; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Foreword; 1. The Archaeology of the Caddo in Southwest Arkansas,Northwest Louisiana, Eastern Oklahoma, andEast Texas: An Introduction to the Volume; 2. Form and Structure in Prehistoric Caddo Pottery Design; 3. At the House of the Priest: Faunal Remains from theCrenshaw Site (3MI6), Southwest Arkansas; 4. Bioarchaeological Evidence of Subsistence Strategiesamong the East Texas Caddo; 5. Spiro Reconsidered: Sacred Economy at the WesternFrontier of the Eastern Woodlands
6. Viewshed Characteristics of Caddo Mounds in theArkansas Basin7. Exploring Prehistoric Caddo Communities throughArchaeogeophysics; 8. The Evolution of a Caddo Community inNortheast Texas; 9. Settlement Patterns and Variation in Caddo PotteryDecoration: A Case Study of the Willow ChuteBayou Locality; 10. Caddo in the Saline River Valley of Arkansas: TheBorderlands Project and the Hughes Site; 11. Spatial Patterns of Caddo Mound Sites in the WestGulf Coastal Plain of Arkansas; 12. Decisions in Landscape Setting Selection of thePrehistoric Caddo of Southeastern Oklahoma:A gis Analysis
13. The Character of Fifteenth- to Seventeenth-CenturyCaddo Communities in the Big Cypress Creek Basinof Northeast Texas14. The Belcher Phase: Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-CenturyCaddo Occupation of the Red River Valley in NorthwestLouisiana and Southwest Arkansas; 15. The Terán Map and Caddo Cosmology; References Cited; Contributors; Index
Summary: This landmark volume provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the prehistory and archaeology of the Caddo peoples. The Caddos lived in the Southeastern Woodlands for more than 900 years beginning around A.D. 800-900, before being forced to relocate to Oklahoma in 1859. They left behind a spectacular archaeological record, including the famous Spiro Mound site in Oklahoma as well as many other mound centers, plazas, farmsteads, villages, and cemeteries.The Archaeology of the Caddo examines new advances in studying the history of the Caddo peoples, including
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Cover; Title Page; Copyright page; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Foreword; 1. The Archaeology of the Caddo in Southwest Arkansas,Northwest Louisiana, Eastern Oklahoma, andEast Texas: An Introduction to the Volume; 2. Form and Structure in Prehistoric Caddo Pottery Design; 3. At the House of the Priest: Faunal Remains from theCrenshaw Site (3MI6), Southwest Arkansas; 4. Bioarchaeological Evidence of Subsistence Strategiesamong the East Texas Caddo; 5. Spiro Reconsidered: Sacred Economy at the WesternFrontier of the Eastern Woodlands

6. Viewshed Characteristics of Caddo Mounds in theArkansas Basin7. Exploring Prehistoric Caddo Communities throughArchaeogeophysics; 8. The Evolution of a Caddo Community inNortheast Texas; 9. Settlement Patterns and Variation in Caddo PotteryDecoration: A Case Study of the Willow ChuteBayou Locality; 10. Caddo in the Saline River Valley of Arkansas: TheBorderlands Project and the Hughes Site; 11. Spatial Patterns of Caddo Mound Sites in the WestGulf Coastal Plain of Arkansas; 12. Decisions in Landscape Setting Selection of thePrehistoric Caddo of Southeastern Oklahoma:A gis Analysis

13. The Character of Fifteenth- to Seventeenth-CenturyCaddo Communities in the Big Cypress Creek Basinof Northeast Texas14. The Belcher Phase: Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-CenturyCaddo Occupation of the Red River Valley in NorthwestLouisiana and Southwest Arkansas; 15. The Terán Map and Caddo Cosmology; References Cited; Contributors; Index

This landmark volume provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the prehistory and archaeology of the Caddo peoples. The Caddos lived in the Southeastern Woodlands for more than 900 years beginning around A.D. 800-900, before being forced to relocate to Oklahoma in 1859. They left behind a spectacular archaeological record, including the famous Spiro Mound site in Oklahoma as well as many other mound centers, plazas, farmsteads, villages, and cemeteries.The Archaeology of the Caddo examines new advances in studying the history of the Caddo peoples, including

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume's 15 chapters are devoted to specific aspects of Caddo archaeology, including contemporary studies of ceramics, burials, and plant and animal remains. All were written by accomplished scholars. There is no summarizing chapter, but the foreword's goal is to present "new advances" in Native Caddo studies by looking closely at important key sites and employing several new research focuses and themes. Importantly, several use GIS and other geophysical aspects of the landscape to explicate different site types and their locations to the environments and ecological niches in the adjoining regions of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. The intriguing sixth chapter examines the "viewshed" of mounded sites in Arkansas: what did people see from the mounds, and what was seen looking toward them at different angles and distances? The last chapter deals with the Teran Map, which was created from a 1691-92 exploration of the Nosoni people in Texas. Though often used to explore settlement patterns, this work views the map as a "cosmogram" reflecting beliefs about Nosoni relationships with their spirit world. Summing Up: Recommended. Professional archaeologists; historians who value archaeological data. P. J. O'Brien emerita, Kansas State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Timothy K. Perttula is the cultural resources director of Archeological & Environmental Consultants LLC. He is the editor of The Prehistory of Texas and the author of "The Caddo Nation": Archaeological and Ethnohistoric Perspectives . Chester P. Walker is the cultural resources director of Archaeo-Geophysical Associates LLC.

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