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Parish Nursing : A Handbook for the New Millennium

By: Koenig, Harold G.
Contributor(s): Smith, Sybil.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2012Description: 1 online resource (238 p.).ISBN: 9781136405884.Subject(s): Parish nursing - Handbooks, manuals, etcGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Parish Nursing : A Handbook for the New MillenniumDDC classification: 610.7343 LOC classification: RT120.P37Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Parish Nursing; Copyright Page; Contents; About the Editor; Foreword: Harold G. Koenig; Preface; Introduction; Part I: Planning for New Millennium Parish Nursing; Chapter 1. A New Landscape for Parish Nursing: Sybil D. Smith; The New Landscape; A Word from the New Executive Director of the IPNRC; Structural Integrity; Lessons in Reflection; Revisioning the Foundation; Summary; Chapter 2. Overview of Parish Nursing: Sybil D. Smith; Scope and Standards of Parish Nursing Practice; Parish Nurse Ministry in the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod; Effectiveness of Parish Nurse Programs
Chapter 3. A Spirit of Commitment and Creativity: Renae SchumannThe Beginnings; The Congregational Outreach Program; Creative Growth; Creative Resources; What Went Wrong; Conclusion and Future Creativity; Chapter 4. From the Westberg Project to the New Millennium: Sybil D. Smith; History; Parish Nurse Education; Entry into Practice; Parish Nursing and Health Care Politics; Pioneering Stories; Parish Nursing in the New Millennium; Summary; Part II: Seeking Structure; Chapter 5. Models for Congregational and Parish Nursing Programs: Sybil D. Smith; Three Models
Levels of Intervention for Parish Nurse ProgramsSummary; Chapter 6. Structure for a Church-Based Parish Nurse Ministry: Virginia M. Wepfer, Paul B. Eckel; Where Are We Now?; What Should Be Done?; What Will Be Done?; How Have We Done?; Summary; Appendix: Sample Job Description for a Parish Nurse; Chapter 7. Barriers, Difficulties, and Challenges: Carol M. Story; Carol's Personal Journey; Barriers Within the Faith Community; Difficulties from Without the Faith Community; Challenges of Interdisciplinary Collaboration; Summary; Part III: Using the Feedback
Chapter 8. The Experience of Parish Nursing: Sybil D. SmithThe Context of Parish Nursing; Elements of Culture; The Experiences; Summary; Chapter 9. Preparation for Community-Based Work: Sybil D. Smith; Background; Immediate Educational Needs; Instructional Modules Funded by the Saint Ann Foundation; The Realities; Reflections and Summary; Appendix A: Health, Healing, and Wholeness Series; Appendix B: Youth Program-Praying for Health,Healing, and Wholeness; Chapter 10. Program Evaluation: Susan Fuentes; Reasons to Evaluate; Evaluation Methods; Chapter 11. Developing Resources: Susan Fuentes
Human ResourcesFinances; Community Development; Part IV: Parish Nursing and End-of-Life Issues; Chapter 12. End-of-Life Issues: Karen M. Brown; Dying in the United States; Description of End-of-LifeIssues; Historical Perspective; The Spiritual Dimension; Summary; Chapter 13. A Role for Parish Nursing in End-of-Life Care: Janet Timms; Demands of the Aging Population; Social Demand for End-of-LifeCare; The Burdened Health Care System; Prevalence of Diseases; Institute of Medicine Core Principles for End-of-Life Care; Parish Nursing Practice; Summary; Index
Summary: Make parish nursing an alternative to shrinking healthcare resources! Because of shrinking healthcare resources, both human and monetary, parish nurses in the future will be called upon to deal with rising numbers of elderly and the end-of-life issues that accompany aging. Parish Nursing: A Handbook for the New Millennium is a guide to designing programs that can complement a congregation's ministry priorities for senior adults, identifying strengths to reinforce and weaknesses to avoid. Stories from the fields of service capture the sweat equity and history of the re-emergence of nurs
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RT120.P37 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1046994 Available EBL1046994

Front Cover; Parish Nursing; Copyright Page; Contents; About the Editor; Foreword: Harold G. Koenig; Preface; Introduction; Part I: Planning for New Millennium Parish Nursing; Chapter 1. A New Landscape for Parish Nursing: Sybil D. Smith; The New Landscape; A Word from the New Executive Director of the IPNRC; Structural Integrity; Lessons in Reflection; Revisioning the Foundation; Summary; Chapter 2. Overview of Parish Nursing: Sybil D. Smith; Scope and Standards of Parish Nursing Practice; Parish Nurse Ministry in the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod; Effectiveness of Parish Nurse Programs

Chapter 3. A Spirit of Commitment and Creativity: Renae SchumannThe Beginnings; The Congregational Outreach Program; Creative Growth; Creative Resources; What Went Wrong; Conclusion and Future Creativity; Chapter 4. From the Westberg Project to the New Millennium: Sybil D. Smith; History; Parish Nurse Education; Entry into Practice; Parish Nursing and Health Care Politics; Pioneering Stories; Parish Nursing in the New Millennium; Summary; Part II: Seeking Structure; Chapter 5. Models for Congregational and Parish Nursing Programs: Sybil D. Smith; Three Models

Levels of Intervention for Parish Nurse ProgramsSummary; Chapter 6. Structure for a Church-Based Parish Nurse Ministry: Virginia M. Wepfer, Paul B. Eckel; Where Are We Now?; What Should Be Done?; What Will Be Done?; How Have We Done?; Summary; Appendix: Sample Job Description for a Parish Nurse; Chapter 7. Barriers, Difficulties, and Challenges: Carol M. Story; Carol's Personal Journey; Barriers Within the Faith Community; Difficulties from Without the Faith Community; Challenges of Interdisciplinary Collaboration; Summary; Part III: Using the Feedback

Chapter 8. The Experience of Parish Nursing: Sybil D. SmithThe Context of Parish Nursing; Elements of Culture; The Experiences; Summary; Chapter 9. Preparation for Community-Based Work: Sybil D. Smith; Background; Immediate Educational Needs; Instructional Modules Funded by the Saint Ann Foundation; The Realities; Reflections and Summary; Appendix A: Health, Healing, and Wholeness Series; Appendix B: Youth Program-Praying for Health,Healing, and Wholeness; Chapter 10. Program Evaluation: Susan Fuentes; Reasons to Evaluate; Evaluation Methods; Chapter 11. Developing Resources: Susan Fuentes

Human ResourcesFinances; Community Development; Part IV: Parish Nursing and End-of-Life Issues; Chapter 12. End-of-Life Issues: Karen M. Brown; Dying in the United States; Description of End-of-LifeIssues; Historical Perspective; The Spiritual Dimension; Summary; Chapter 13. A Role for Parish Nursing in End-of-Life Care: Janet Timms; Demands of the Aging Population; Social Demand for End-of-LifeCare; The Burdened Health Care System; Prevalence of Diseases; Institute of Medicine Core Principles for End-of-Life Care; Parish Nursing Practice; Summary; Index

Make parish nursing an alternative to shrinking healthcare resources! Because of shrinking healthcare resources, both human and monetary, parish nurses in the future will be called upon to deal with rising numbers of elderly and the end-of-life issues that accompany aging. Parish Nursing: A Handbook for the New Millennium is a guide to designing programs that can complement a congregation's ministry priorities for senior adults, identifying strengths to reinforce and weaknesses to avoid. Stories from the fields of service capture the sweat equity and history of the re-emergence of nurs

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Editor Smith has brought together experiences of parish nurses as they established and maintained health ministries in different areas of the country. Included are diagrammatic models of various ministries, strategic plans, methods for acquiring equipment and supplies, and sample proposals to initiate parish nurse ministries within churches and other faith communities. Pioneer parish nurses met skepticism, disbelief, negativity, even outright hostility from pastors and directors. Once in place, problems arose associated with acquiring workstations/offices, equipment, and basic supplies. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the concept was new and untried. Initially, some programs failed due to lack of commitment by the pastor or director. Success of programs occurred primarily because of parishioners needing health information, advice, and care that were immediately available and provided without cost to the individual. The critical factors to ensure programs' success are the support, encouragement, and funding from the pastor. For parish nurses with established health ministries, and those interested in developing a parish nurse ministry within their own parish or faith community. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals; two-year technical program students. A. R. Davis emerita, Johns Hopkins University

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