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Slave Breeding : Sex and Slavery in African American History

By: Smithers, Gregory D.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Florida : University Press of Florida, 2012Description: 1 online resource (271 p.).ISBN: 9780813042602.Subject(s): African Americans - Southern States - History | Slavery - United States - History | Slaves - United States - Sexual behavior - History | Slaves - United States - Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Slave Breeding : Sex and Slavery in African American HistoryDDC classification: 306.3/620975 | 306.3620973 | 306.3620975 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. American Abolitionism and Slave-Breeding Discourse; 2. Slavery, the Lost Cause, and African American History; 3. Black History and Slave Breeding in the Early Twentieth Century; 4. The Theater of Memory; 5. The WPA Narratives and Slave Breeding; 6. Sex, Violence, and the Quest for Civil Rights; 7. Slave Breeding in Literature, Film, and New Media; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y
Summary: For over two centuries, the topic of slave breeding has occupied a controversial place in the master narrative of American history. From nineteenth-century abolitionists to twentieth-century filmmakers and artists, Americans have debated whether slave owners deliberately and coercively manipulated the sexual practices and marital status of enslaved African Americans to reproduce new generations of slaves for profit. In this bold and provocative book, historian Gregory Smithers investigates how African Americans have narrated, remembered, and represented slave-breeding practices. He ar
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E443 .S64 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1053767 Available EBL1053767

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. American Abolitionism and Slave-Breeding Discourse; 2. Slavery, the Lost Cause, and African American History; 3. Black History and Slave Breeding in the Early Twentieth Century; 4. The Theater of Memory; 5. The WPA Narratives and Slave Breeding; 6. Sex, Violence, and the Quest for Civil Rights; 7. Slave Breeding in Literature, Film, and New Media; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y

For over two centuries, the topic of slave breeding has occupied a controversial place in the master narrative of American history. From nineteenth-century abolitionists to twentieth-century filmmakers and artists, Americans have debated whether slave owners deliberately and coercively manipulated the sexual practices and marital status of enslaved African Americans to reproduce new generations of slaves for profit. In this bold and provocative book, historian Gregory Smithers investigates how African Americans have narrated, remembered, and represented slave-breeding practices. He ar

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

The controversial topic of slave breeding--the forced or manipulated sexual relations of African Americans under the "peculiar institution"--runs like a leitmotif through the history of slavery, the historiography of slavery, American literature, and American culture generally. Antebellum abolitionists exposed and condemned it. Slaveholders and white supremacists, before, during, and after the Civil War, denied, explained away, or trivialized the practice. The debate always has focused on whether or not slave owners deliberately and coercively managed the sexual and marital relations of slaves to reproduce more slaves for the profit of slaveholders. Smithers (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.) examines narratives over slave breeding topically from the perspective of abolitionists, Lost Cause mythologizers, black and white historians, playwrights, historical memory, New Deal era oral histories, the modern civil rights movement, and literature, film, and new media. He identifies tension between the black vernacular understanding of slave breeding (rape, violence, family dislocation) and white historians' narratives (slave breeding as myth or abolitionist propaganda, or based on unreliable oral histories from elderly ex-slaves). Smithers underscores the broad meaning of the continuing debates over sexual violence during and after slavery, the centrality of the African American family, and white hypocrisy. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte

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