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Terrorism, Instability, and Democracy in Asia and Africa.

By: Cox, Dan G.
Contributor(s): Falconer, John | Stackhouse, Brian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Northeastern Series on Democratization and Political Development: Publisher: Lebanon : Northeastern University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (241 p.).ISBN: 9781555537463.Subject(s): Africa -- Politics and government -- 21st century | Asia -- Politics and government -- 21st century | Democracy -- Africa | Democracy -- Asia | Political stability -- Africa | Political stability -- Asia | Terrorism -- Africa | Terrorism -- AsiaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Terrorism, Instability, and Democracy in Asia and AfricaDDC classification: 342.5029 | 363.325095 LOC classification: JQ24 .C69 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Title Page; Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Defining Terrorism; Chapter 3: A Clash of Civilizations, the Democratic Peace, the Poverty-Terrorism Nexus, or Regime Instability; Chapter 4: Methods Used to Investigate the Causes of Terrorism in Asia and Africa; Chapter 5: Analyzing International Terrorism in Asia and Africa; Chapter 6: Analyzing Domestic Terrorismin Asia and Africa; Chapter 7: Terrorism, Transition, Economic Growth, and Instability in Southeast Asia; Chapter 8: East Asia: A Lack of Sustained Terrorism
Chapter 9: The Large and Constant Specter of Terrorism in South AsiaChapter 10: Central Asia and the Role of the Soviet Union; Chapter 11: Terrorism in Northern Africa; Chapter 12: The Terrorist Experience in Sub-Saharan Africa; Chapter 13: Conclusion and Policy Prescriptions; Index
Summary: A chilling, up-to-the-minute look at the links between political instability and terrorism in Asia and Africa
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JQ24 .C69 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1084939 Available EBL1084939

Front Cover; Title Page; Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Defining Terrorism; Chapter 3: A Clash of Civilizations, the Democratic Peace, the Poverty-Terrorism Nexus, or Regime Instability; Chapter 4: Methods Used to Investigate the Causes of Terrorism in Asia and Africa; Chapter 5: Analyzing International Terrorism in Asia and Africa; Chapter 6: Analyzing Domestic Terrorismin Asia and Africa; Chapter 7: Terrorism, Transition, Economic Growth, and Instability in Southeast Asia; Chapter 8: East Asia: A Lack of Sustained Terrorism

Chapter 9: The Large and Constant Specter of Terrorism in South AsiaChapter 10: Central Asia and the Role of the Soviet Union; Chapter 11: Terrorism in Northern Africa; Chapter 12: The Terrorist Experience in Sub-Saharan Africa; Chapter 13: Conclusion and Policy Prescriptions; Index

A chilling, up-to-the-minute look at the links between political instability and terrorism in Asia and Africa

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cox (US Army School of Advanced Military Studies), Falconer (Univ. of Nebraska), and Stackhouse (Missouri Western State Univ.) explore terrorism in Asia and Africa. Specifically, the authors ask if a clash of civilizations drives terrorism and if the aggressive promotion of democracy will serve as a deterrent. They use both correlation and mini case studies. The book is oriented toward practitioners and thus does not include extensive literature reviews. The scope of the authors' study includes both international and domestic terrorism, without allowing for the possibility of separate causality. The quantitative studies cover international terrorism from 1975 to 2003 and domestic terrorism from 1998 to 2003. They use Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism-Terrorism Knowledge Base (MIPT-TKB) data, excluding attacks on military or police targets. The focus is on the relationships between terrorism and civilization, democracy, poverty, and regime stability. The results are only suggestive since they use simple correlations of country averages and do not control for other factors. The mini-studies include other types of political violence, such as ethnic violence. Nonetheless, the authors explore salient foreign policy questions. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, undergraduate students of all levels, graduate students, and professionals. J. S. Holmes University of Texas at Dallas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

DAN G. COX is associate professor of Political Science for the US Army Command and General Staff College's School of Advanced Military Studies in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He has published previously on the topic of terrorism. JOHN FALCONER is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. BRIAN STACKHOUSE is a major in the U.S. Army who served extensively in Africa. He is an instructor of military science at Missouri Western State University.

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