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Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi : Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965

By: Marshall, James P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (329 p.).ISBN: 9780807149850.Subject(s): African American college students - Political activity - Mississippi - History - 20th century | African American college students -- Political activity -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | African Americans - Civil rights - Mississippi - History - 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | African Americans - Mississippi - Politics and government - 20th century | African Americans -- Mississippi -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Civil rights movements - Mississippi - History - 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | College students - Political activity - Mississippi - History - 20th century | College students -- Political activity -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | Mississippi - Politics and government - 1951- | Mississippi -- Politics and government -- 1951 | Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party | Student movements - Mississippi - History - 20th century | Student movements -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi : Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965DDC classification: 323.11960730 | 323.11960730762 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Cities and Towns in Mississippi, by County; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. The Incipient Movement; 2. The Decision to Go into Voter Registration; 3. Warming Up Mississippi: The Movement Becomes a Local Thing; 4. Commitment Aborted; 5. The Stalemated Movement; 6. The Birth of Protest Politics; 7. Freedom Summer, Part I; 8. Freedom Summer, Part II: Freedom Schools and Community Centers; 9. The Political Organization of Protest Politics, Part I
10. The Political Organization of Protest Politics, Part II: The Second Freedom Vote and the Breakup of COFOConclusions; Afterword; Appendix: The Power of Protection: The Federal Government; Notes on Sources; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: In 1960, Mississippi society still drew a sharp line between its African American and white communities. In the 1890s, the state had created a repressive racial system that ensured white supremacy by legally segregating black residents and removing their basic citizenship and voting rights. Over the ensuing decades, white residents suppressed African Americans who dared challenge that system with an array of violence, terror, and murder. In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged this repressive racial order by encouraging African Americans to reassert the
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.93.M6 .S27 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1092465 Available EBL1092465

Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Cities and Towns in Mississippi, by County; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. The Incipient Movement; 2. The Decision to Go into Voter Registration; 3. Warming Up Mississippi: The Movement Becomes a Local Thing; 4. Commitment Aborted; 5. The Stalemated Movement; 6. The Birth of Protest Politics; 7. Freedom Summer, Part I; 8. Freedom Summer, Part II: Freedom Schools and Community Centers; 9. The Political Organization of Protest Politics, Part I

10. The Political Organization of Protest Politics, Part II: The Second Freedom Vote and the Breakup of COFOConclusions; Afterword; Appendix: The Power of Protection: The Federal Government; Notes on Sources; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

In 1960, Mississippi society still drew a sharp line between its African American and white communities. In the 1890s, the state had created a repressive racial system that ensured white supremacy by legally segregating black residents and removing their basic citizenship and voting rights. Over the ensuing decades, white residents suppressed African Americans who dared challenge that system with an array of violence, terror, and murder. In 1960, students supporting civil rights moved into Mississippi and challenged this repressive racial order by encouraging African Americans to reassert the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a meticulous and precise memoir of the freedom struggles in Mississippi from 1960 to 1965. It covers the period between the nascent voter education project and the emergence of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Independent scholar Marshall delineates with precision the different factions and controversies within the civil rights community. From Aaron Henry's middle-class NAACP to the grassroots Council of Federated Organizations, the discussions about tactics and strategy were lively and contentious. The author offers a clear description of the white terror, from the arrest and murder of three civil rights workers in June 1964 to the murders of those attempting to register to vote. Particularly useful is the discussion of county-by-county organizations, i.e., "freedom schools" and other preparations for activism. The mobilization of a largely rural population with high rates of illiteracy was testament to the precision of combined organizations. Also important is the point that such projects were achieved despite some considerable divisions between the competing organizations. And Marshall's account of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party is clear and concise. An outstanding work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. D. R. Turner Davis and Elkins College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>James P. Marshall is an independent scholar and former non-resident fellow at the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.</p> <p>Staughton Lynd is a former professor of history at Yale University, a civil and labor rights activist and lawyer, and the author of numerous books on race, labor, and radical politics.</p>

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