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Literacy, Literature and Identity : Multiple Perspectives

By: Roscoe, Adrian.
Contributor(s): Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (249 p.).ISBN: 9781443843935.Subject(s): Group identity in literature | Identity (Philosophical concept) in literature | LiteratureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Literacy, Literature and Identity : Multiple PerspectivesDDC classification: 809.93355 LOC classification: PN56.N19 .R384 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER ONE; CHAPTER TWO; CHAPTER THREE; CHAPTER FOUR; CHAPTER FIVE; CHAPTER SIX; CHAPTER SEVEN; CHAPTER EIGHT; CHAPTER NINE; CHAPTER TEN; CHAPTER ELEVEN; CONTRIBUTORS
Summary: Modern humanities scholarship presents a scene of intriguing change. A leading figure like Professor Eagleton moves suddenly from theory to a fascination with culture, while still wrestling with literature's meaning and function. Creative non-fiction becomes fashionable while life writings retain a very wide readership. Language professionals, meanwhile, ask themselves if teaching an alien tongue can be done without teaching its associated culture, and what this might mean for individual and ...
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN56.N19 .R384 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1107018 Available EBL1107018

CONTENTS; PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER ONE; CHAPTER TWO; CHAPTER THREE; CHAPTER FOUR; CHAPTER FIVE; CHAPTER SIX; CHAPTER SEVEN; CHAPTER EIGHT; CHAPTER NINE; CHAPTER TEN; CHAPTER ELEVEN; CONTRIBUTORS

Modern humanities scholarship presents a scene of intriguing change. A leading figure like Professor Eagleton moves suddenly from theory to a fascination with culture, while still wrestling with literature's meaning and function. Creative non-fiction becomes fashionable while life writings retain a very wide readership. Language professionals, meanwhile, ask themselves if teaching an alien tongue can be done without teaching its associated culture, and what this might mean for individual and ...

Description based upon print version of record.

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