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Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana, 1718-1870.

By: Bell, Caryn Cossé.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 1997Description: 1 online resource (344 p.).ISBN: 9780807141526.Subject(s): African Americans - Louisiana - New Orleans - Politics and government | African Americans -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- Politics and government | Creoles - Louisiana - New Orleans - Politics and government | Creoles -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- Politics and government | New Orleans (La.) - History | New Orleans (La.) -- History | Radicalism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 18th century | Radicalism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 19th century | Radicalism -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History -- 19th century | Republicanism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 18th century | Republicanism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 19th century | Romanticism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 18th century | Romanticism - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 19th century | Slavery -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana, 1718–1870DDC classification: 976.335 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Revolution and the Origins of Dissent; 2 The Republican Cause and the Afro-Creole Militia; 3 The New American Racial Order; 4 Romanticism, Social Protest, and Reform; 5 French Freemasonry and the Republican Heritage; 6 Spiritualism's Dissident Visionaries; 7 War, Reconstruction, and the Politics of Radicalism; Conclusion; Appendix: Membership in Two Masonic Lodges and Biographical Information; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: With the Federal occupation of New Orleans in 1862, Afro-Creole leaders in that city, along with their white allies, seized upon the ideals of the American and French Revolutions and images of revolutionary events in the French Caribbean and demanded Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité. Their republican idealism produced the postwar South's most progressive vision of the future. Caryn Cossé Bell, in her impressive, sweeping study, traces the eighteenth-century origins of this Afro-Creole political and intellectual heritage, its evolution in antebellum New Orleans, and its impact on the Civil War and
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F379.N59 .R43 1997 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1111905 Available EBL1111905

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Revolution and the Origins of Dissent; 2 The Republican Cause and the Afro-Creole Militia; 3 The New American Racial Order; 4 Romanticism, Social Protest, and Reform; 5 French Freemasonry and the Republican Heritage; 6 Spiritualism's Dissident Visionaries; 7 War, Reconstruction, and the Politics of Radicalism; Conclusion; Appendix: Membership in Two Masonic Lodges and Biographical Information; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

With the Federal occupation of New Orleans in 1862, Afro-Creole leaders in that city, along with their white allies, seized upon the ideals of the American and French Revolutions and images of revolutionary events in the French Caribbean and demanded Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité. Their republican idealism produced the postwar South's most progressive vision of the future. Caryn Cossé Bell, in her impressive, sweeping study, traces the eighteenth-century origins of this Afro-Creole political and intellectual heritage, its evolution in antebellum New Orleans, and its impact on the Civil War and

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Caryn Coss#65533; Bell is an assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.</p>

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