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A Disease in the Public Mind : A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil War

By: Fleming, Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Da Capo Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (385 p.).ISBN: 9780306822018.Subject(s): Antislavery movements - United States - History - 19th century | Antislavery movements -- United States -- History -- 19th century | New England - Relations - Southern States | New England -- Relations -- Southern States | Political culture - United States - History - 19th century | Political culture -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery - Political aspects - United States - History - 19th century | Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Southern States - Relations - New England | Southern States -- Relations -- New England | United States - History - 1815-1861 | United States -- History -- 1815-1861 -- Biography | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Causes | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Causes | United States - Politics and government - 1815-1861 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1815-1861Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Disease in the Public Mind : A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil WarDDC classification: 973.7/11 | 973.711 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Prologue: John Brown's Raid; 1. Slavery Comes to America; 2. Slavery's Great Foe- and Unintended Friend; 3. The First Emancipation Proclamation; 4. One Head Turning into Thirteen; 5. The Forgotten Emancipator; 6. Thomas Jefferson's Nightmare; 7. New England Preaches - and Almost Practices - Secession; 8. How Not to Abolish Slavery; 9. New England Rediscovers the Sacred Union; 10. Another Thomas Jefferson Urges Virginia to Abolish Slavery; 11. The Abolitionist Who Lost His Faith; 12. Abolitionism Divides and Conquers Itself; 13. Enter Old Man Eloquent; 14. The Slave Patrols
15. The Trouble with Texas16. Slave Power Paranoia; 17. From Uncle Tom to John Brown; 18. The Real Uncle Tom and the Unknown South He Helped Create; 19. Free Soil for Free (White) Men; 20. The Whole World Is Watching; 21. An Ex-President Tries to Save the Union; 22. The Anguish of Robert E. Lee; 23. The End of Illusions; 24. The Third Emancipation Proclamation; 25. The Hunt After the Caption; Epilogue: Lincoln's Visitor; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: A distinguished historian and popular author explores why the United States became the only nation in the world to fight
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E459 .F55 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1113958 Available EBL1113958

Contents; Preface; Prologue: John Brown's Raid; 1. Slavery Comes to America; 2. Slavery's Great Foe- and Unintended Friend; 3. The First Emancipation Proclamation; 4. One Head Turning into Thirteen; 5. The Forgotten Emancipator; 6. Thomas Jefferson's Nightmare; 7. New England Preaches - and Almost Practices - Secession; 8. How Not to Abolish Slavery; 9. New England Rediscovers the Sacred Union; 10. Another Thomas Jefferson Urges Virginia to Abolish Slavery; 11. The Abolitionist Who Lost His Faith; 12. Abolitionism Divides and Conquers Itself; 13. Enter Old Man Eloquent; 14. The Slave Patrols

15. The Trouble with Texas16. Slave Power Paranoia; 17. From Uncle Tom to John Brown; 18. The Real Uncle Tom and the Unknown South He Helped Create; 19. Free Soil for Free (White) Men; 20. The Whole World Is Watching; 21. An Ex-President Tries to Save the Union; 22. The Anguish of Robert E. Lee; 23. The End of Illusions; 24. The Third Emancipation Proclamation; 25. The Hunt After the Caption; Epilogue: Lincoln's Visitor; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

A distinguished historian and popular author explores why the United States became the only nation in the world to fight

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

With the premise that the United States was the only nation to fight a large-scale war to end slavery, prolific popular historian Fleming (The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers) attempts to explain why we went about abolishing slavery in that way. Behind his approach is the idea that it need not have taken a war. He locates radical abolition in the North, stirring up hatred for Southern white men, and Southerners' irrational fear of race wars owing to what happened in Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) as "diseases in the public mind" that were morally culpable for the tragedy of the Civil War. Many readers will find Fleming's criticism of abolitionist heroes such as William Lloyd Garrison, along with his nuanced position on Southern slavery, controversial. They may also locate factual errors (e.g., references to West Virginia in the 1820s long before it existed as a separate state). The author's distinction between "pilgrims" and "puritans" when describing New England culture is muddied. Finally, he ignores one of the most obvious reasons for why it took a civil war to end slavery in the United States: geography. Slavery was a sectional issue here; it did not exist as such in other nations. VERDICT Not recommended.-Michael Farrell, Reformed Theol. Seminary, Orlando, FL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas James Fleming was born in Jersey City, New Jersey on July 5, 1927. During World War II, he served on the cruiser Topeka. He graduated from Fordham University in 1950. He worked as a reporter for The Herald-Statesman in Yonkers and as the executive editor of Cosmopolitan magazine. In 1958, he was asked to write an article for Cosmopolitan about the Battle of Bunker Hill. This assignment led to his writing his first non-fiction book Now We Are Enemies. <p> He wrote almost 50 fiction and non-fiction books during his lifetime. His novels include All Good Men, The Officers' Wives, and Dreams of Glory. His non-fiction book included Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr and the Future of America; The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers; The Great Divide: The Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson That Defined a Nation; and The Strategy of Victory: How General George Washington Won the American Revolution. In 2005, he wrote a memoir entitled Mysteries of My Father. He died on July 23, 2017 at the age of 90. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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