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The South American Expeditions, 1540-1545.

By: Morrow, Baker H.
Contributor(s): Cabeza de Vaca, Álvar Núñez.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (266 p.).ISBN: 9780826350657.Subject(s): Governors -- Rio de la Plata Region (Argentina and Uruguay) -- Biography | Nu´n~ez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar, 16th cent | Rio de la Plata Region (Argentina and Uruguay) -- Description and travel -- Early works to 1800 | Rio de la Plata Region (Argentina and Uruguay) -- Discovery and exploration -- Spanish | South America -- Description and travel -- Early works to 1800 | South America -- Discovery and exploration -- SpanishGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The South American Expeditions, 1540-1545DDC classification: 980.013 | 980/.013 LOC classification: E125.N9 A3 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Translator's Note; Translator's Acknowledgments; 1: A Word About the Commentaries of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca; 2: We Leave the Island of Cape Verde; 3: The Governor and His Fleet Arrive at Santa Catalina, in Brazil, Where the Company Disembarks; 4: Nine Christians Come to the Island; 5: The Governor Makes Haste on His Journey; 6: The Governor and His People Begin Their First Ventures into the Interior; 7: What the Governor and His People Went By Along the Road, and What Sort of Country It Is
8: Hardships Along the Way for the Governor and His People, and the Kinds of Pines and Pine Cones in That Land9: The Explorers Starve, but Save Themselves with Worms, Which They Get from Some Canes; 10: The Indians Are Afraid of Horses; 11: The Governor Travels by Canoe on the Río de Iguaza, and the Men Carry their Canoes on Their Shoulders for a League to Bypass a Bad Stretch of the River at Some Rapids; 12: They Make Rafts to Carry the Sick; 13: The Governor Arrives at the City of Asunción, Where He Finds the Christian Spaniards He Had Come to Help
14: The Spaniards Who had Fallen Ill on the Río de Piqueri Arrive in the City of Asunción15: The Governor Sends Help to the People Who Had Gone in His Flagship to Buenos Aires to Assist in the Resettlement of That Port; 16: They Kill the Enemies They Capture, and Then Eat Them; 17: The Governor Concludes a Peace with the Agaces Tribe; 18: The Settlers Complain About Your Majesty's Officials to the Governor; 19: They Complain About the Guaycuru Indians to the Governor; 20: The Governor Asks for More Details About the Complaint
21: The Governor and His People Cross the River, and Two Christians Drown22: Spies Go Out by Order of the Governor to Follow the Guaycuru Indians; 23: Following the Enemy, the Governor is Advised that They Are Just Ahead; 24: A Jaguar Causes an Uproar Between the Spaniards and the Indians; 25: The Governor and His Men Catch Up with the Enemy; 26: The Governor Breaks His Enemies; 27: The Governor Returns to the City of Asunción with All His Men; 28: The Agaces Indians Break the Peace; 29: The Governor Sets One of the Guaycuru Prisoners Free and Sends Him to Fetch the Others
30: The Guaycurues Come to Give Their Allegiance to His Majesty31: The Governor, Making Peace with the Guaycurues, Returns His Prisoners; 32: The Aperues Indians Come to Make Peace and Give Their Allegiance; 33: Sentence Is Passed on the Agaces, with an Opinion Offered by the Clerics, the Captains, and Your Majesty's Officials; 34: The Governor Again Helps the People of Buenos Aires; 35: Three Christians and Some Indians Come Back from Their Explorations; 36: Boards Are Cut for Brigantines and a Caravel; 37: The Indians of the Countryside Return to Be of Service
38: The Town of Asunción Burns
Summary: This book is one of the great first-person accounts of the Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century. Morrow's new translation makes Cabeza de Vaca's adventures available to a wide English-speaking audience for the first time.
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E125.N9 A3 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1119038 Available EBL1119038

Front Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Translator's Note; Translator's Acknowledgments; 1: A Word About the Commentaries of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca; 2: We Leave the Island of Cape Verde; 3: The Governor and His Fleet Arrive at Santa Catalina, in Brazil, Where the Company Disembarks; 4: Nine Christians Come to the Island; 5: The Governor Makes Haste on His Journey; 6: The Governor and His People Begin Their First Ventures into the Interior; 7: What the Governor and His People Went By Along the Road, and What Sort of Country It Is

8: Hardships Along the Way for the Governor and His People, and the Kinds of Pines and Pine Cones in That Land9: The Explorers Starve, but Save Themselves with Worms, Which They Get from Some Canes; 10: The Indians Are Afraid of Horses; 11: The Governor Travels by Canoe on the Río de Iguaza, and the Men Carry their Canoes on Their Shoulders for a League to Bypass a Bad Stretch of the River at Some Rapids; 12: They Make Rafts to Carry the Sick; 13: The Governor Arrives at the City of Asunción, Where He Finds the Christian Spaniards He Had Come to Help

14: The Spaniards Who had Fallen Ill on the Río de Piqueri Arrive in the City of Asunción15: The Governor Sends Help to the People Who Had Gone in His Flagship to Buenos Aires to Assist in the Resettlement of That Port; 16: They Kill the Enemies They Capture, and Then Eat Them; 17: The Governor Concludes a Peace with the Agaces Tribe; 18: The Settlers Complain About Your Majesty's Officials to the Governor; 19: They Complain About the Guaycuru Indians to the Governor; 20: The Governor Asks for More Details About the Complaint

21: The Governor and His People Cross the River, and Two Christians Drown22: Spies Go Out by Order of the Governor to Follow the Guaycuru Indians; 23: Following the Enemy, the Governor is Advised that They Are Just Ahead; 24: A Jaguar Causes an Uproar Between the Spaniards and the Indians; 25: The Governor and His Men Catch Up with the Enemy; 26: The Governor Breaks His Enemies; 27: The Governor Returns to the City of Asunción with All His Men; 28: The Agaces Indians Break the Peace; 29: The Governor Sets One of the Guaycuru Prisoners Free and Sends Him to Fetch the Others

30: The Guaycurues Come to Give Their Allegiance to His Majesty31: The Governor, Making Peace with the Guaycurues, Returns His Prisoners; 32: The Aperues Indians Come to Make Peace and Give Their Allegiance; 33: Sentence Is Passed on the Agaces, with an Opinion Offered by the Clerics, the Captains, and Your Majesty's Officials; 34: The Governor Again Helps the People of Buenos Aires; 35: Three Christians and Some Indians Come Back from Their Explorations; 36: Boards Are Cut for Brigantines and a Caravel; 37: The Indians of the Countryside Return to Be of Service

38: The Town of Asunción Burns

This book is one of the great first-person accounts of the Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century. Morrow's new translation makes Cabeza de Vaca's adventures available to a wide English-speaking audience for the first time.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Morrow has given English readers a well-edited edition of a first-person account from the pen of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, a conquistador turned champion of human rights. Cabeza de Vaca wrote two narratives about his trials and travels in North America (La Relacion, The Report, 1542) and South America (Commentaries, 1555). Edited for modern readers, this new edition covers his five years as governor of the Rio de la Plata. Cabeza de Vaca's writing is interesting for its unique perspective and also for its early observations of flora and fauna in the New World. However, his popularity among the Spanish conquistadores waned. The Spanish settlers in the New World accused him of being a traitor for his emphasis on the human rights of the native peoples. Unfortunately, this concern for their well-being contributed to his losing the support of the Spanish conquistadores. This, together with his failure in reorganizing the colonization, led to Cabeza de Vaca's arrest for mismanagement and treason in 1545. He was returned to Spain for trial. Although he was exonerated, Cabeza de Vaca never returned to the colony. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate libraries. R. A. Santillan Medgar Evers College, CUNY

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