The Ideology of Slavery : Proslavery Thought in the Antebellum South, 1830-1860

By: Faust, Drew GilpinMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandLibrary of Southern Civilization: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 1981Description: 1 online resource (319 p.)ISBN: 9780807153956Subject(s): African Americans -- History -- To 1863 -- Sources | Slavery -- Southern States -- History -- Sources | Southern States -- History -- 1775-1865 -- SourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Ideology of Slavery : Proslavery Thought in the Antebellum South, 1830–1860DDC classification: 306.362 | 975.00496073 | 975/.00496073 LOC classification: E449 .I26 | F387 1981Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; INTRODUCTION: The Proslavery Argument in History; I. THOMAS RODERICK DEW: Abolition of Negro Slavery; II. WILLIAM HARPER: Memoir on Slavery; III. THORNTON STRINGFELLOW: A Brief Examination of Scripture Testimony on the Institution of Slavery; IV. JAMES HENRY HAMMOND: Letter to an English Abolitionist; V. JOSIAH C. NOTT: Two Lectures on the Natural History of the Caucasian and Negro Races; VI. HENRY HUGHES: Treatise on Sociology; VII. GEORGE FITZHUGH: Southern Thought; Selected Bibliography of Secondary Works on the Proslavery Argument
Summary: In one volume, these essentially unabridged selections from the works of the proslavery apologists are now conveniently accessible to scholars and students of the antebellum South. The Ideology of Slavery includes excerpts by Thomas R. Dew, founder of a new phase of proslavery militancy; William Harper and James Henry Hammond, representatives of the proslavery mainstream; Thornton Stringfellow, the most prominent biblical defender of the peculiar institution; Henry Hughes and Josiah Nott, who brought would-be scientism to the argument; and George Fitzhugh, the most extreme of proslavery writer
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E449 .I26 F387 1981 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1120076 Available EBL1120076
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E449 .H2985 2010 Border War : E449 .H48344 2006 Southern Outcast : E449 .H799 2012 Negro Comrades of the Crown : E449 .I26 F387 1981 The Ideology of Slavery : E449.J775 2007 Slavery and the Meetinghouse : E449 .R644 2010 Hearts Beating for Liberty : E451 John Brown Still Lives! :

Cover; Contents; Preface; INTRODUCTION: The Proslavery Argument in History; I. THOMAS RODERICK DEW: Abolition of Negro Slavery; II. WILLIAM HARPER: Memoir on Slavery; III. THORNTON STRINGFELLOW: A Brief Examination of Scripture Testimony on the Institution of Slavery; IV. JAMES HENRY HAMMOND: Letter to an English Abolitionist; V. JOSIAH C. NOTT: Two Lectures on the Natural History of the Caucasian and Negro Races; VI. HENRY HUGHES: Treatise on Sociology; VII. GEORGE FITZHUGH: Southern Thought; Selected Bibliography of Secondary Works on the Proslavery Argument

In one volume, these essentially unabridged selections from the works of the proslavery apologists are now conveniently accessible to scholars and students of the antebellum South. The Ideology of Slavery includes excerpts by Thomas R. Dew, founder of a new phase of proslavery militancy; William Harper and James Henry Hammond, representatives of the proslavery mainstream; Thornton Stringfellow, the most prominent biblical defender of the peculiar institution; Henry Hughes and Josiah Nott, who brought would-be scientism to the argument; and George Fitzhugh, the most extreme of proslavery writer

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Drew Gilpin Faust, associate professor and chairman of the department of American Civilization at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author of A Sacred Circle: The Dilemma of the Intellectual in the Old South, 1840-1860.

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