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Power to the Poor : Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974

By: Mantler, Gordon K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (377 p.).ISBN: 9781469608075.Subject(s): African Americans -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | Coalitions -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Ethnicity -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Hispanic Americans -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | Political activists -- United States -- Biography | Poverty -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Social justice -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Social movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Economic conditions -- 1961-1971 | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Power to the Poor : Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974DDC classification: 305.800973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Abbreviations in the Text; Introduction; 1 The "Rediscovery" of Poverty; 2 First Experiments; 3 War, Power, and the New Politics; 4 Poverty, Peace, and King's Challenge; 5 Race and Resurrection City; 6 Multiracial Efforts, Intra-racial Gains; 7 The Limits of Coalition; 8 Making the 1970s; Epilogue: Poverty, Coalition, and Identity Politics; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights and Chicano movement history, Gordon K. Mantler demonstrates how King's unfinished crusade became the era's most high-profile attempt at multiracial collaboration and sheds light on the interdependent relationship between racial identity and political coalition among African Americans and Mexican Americans. Mantler argues that while the fight against poverty held great potential for b
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.8 .M19 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1120505 Available EBL1120505

Cover; Contents; Abbreviations in the Text; Introduction; 1 The "Rediscovery" of Poverty; 2 First Experiments; 3 War, Power, and the New Politics; 4 Poverty, Peace, and King's Challenge; 5 Race and Resurrection City; 6 Multiracial Efforts, Intra-racial Gains; 7 The Limits of Coalition; 8 Making the 1970s; Epilogue: Poverty, Coalition, and Identity Politics; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights and Chicano movement history, Gordon K. Mantler demonstrates how King's unfinished crusade became the era's most high-profile attempt at multiracial collaboration and sheds light on the interdependent relationship between racial identity and political coalition among African Americans and Mexican Americans. Mantler argues that while the fight against poverty held great potential for b

Description based upon print version of record.

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