Atlanta, Cradle of the New South : Race and Remembering in the Civil War's Aftermath

By: Link, William AMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (264 p.)ISBN: 9781469608327Subject(s): African Americans -- Georgia -- Atlanta -- Social conditions | Atlanta (Ga.) -- Race relations -- History | Atlanta (Ga.) -- Social conditions | Memory -- Social aspects -- Georgia -- Atlanta | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- InfluenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Atlanta, Cradle of the New South : Race and Remembering in the Civil War's AftermathDDC classification: 305.8009758231 LOC classification: F294.A89 .L445 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; ONE: A Troublesome Thing: Invasion; TWO: Ocean of Ruins: Destruction and Rebirth; THREE: A Forgetfulness of the Past: Rebuilding the Racial Order; FOUR: Every Contrivance of Cruelty: Violence and White Supremacy in the New South; FIVE: We Are Rising: Schooling the City; SIX: Wheel within a Wheel: Competing Visions; SEVEN: The New South in Crisis; Epilogue: The Propaganda of History; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: After conquering Atlanta in the summer of 1864 and occupying it for two months, Union forces laid waste to the city in November. William T. Sherman's invasion was a pivotal moment in the history of the South and Atlanta's rebuilding over the following fifty years came to represent the contested meaning of the Civil War itself. The war's aftermath brought contentious transition from Old South to New for whites and African Americans alike. Historian William Link argues that this struggle defined the broader meaning of the Civil War in the modern South, with no place embodying the region's past a
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F294.A89 .L445 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1120528 Available EBL1120528

Cover; Contents; Introduction; ONE: A Troublesome Thing: Invasion; TWO: Ocean of Ruins: Destruction and Rebirth; THREE: A Forgetfulness of the Past: Rebuilding the Racial Order; FOUR: Every Contrivance of Cruelty: Violence and White Supremacy in the New South; FIVE: We Are Rising: Schooling the City; SIX: Wheel within a Wheel: Competing Visions; SEVEN: The New South in Crisis; Epilogue: The Propaganda of History; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

After conquering Atlanta in the summer of 1864 and occupying it for two months, Union forces laid waste to the city in November. William T. Sherman's invasion was a pivotal moment in the history of the South and Atlanta's rebuilding over the following fifty years came to represent the contested meaning of the Civil War itself. The war's aftermath brought contentious transition from Old South to New for whites and African Americans alike. Historian William Link argues that this struggle defined the broader meaning of the Civil War in the modern South, with no place embodying the region's past a

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Aptly titled, this book gives readers an understanding of the impact of the Civil War, an analysis of differing perceptions of the war, and a compelling look at the dichotomies of Atlanta as a commercially vibrant center for whites and blacks set in a racially charged atmosphere that culminated in the Atlanta Riot of 1906. At times, the chapters read as separate essays. One does learn of the development of Atlanta University, of Henry Grady, and of the fractious dialogue between Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois. One chapter, though illustrative of the racial atmosphere, centers on the murder of George Ashburn, a white more closely associated with Columbus, Georgia. There are curious elements, such as a photograph of Boston activist William Monroe Trotter but not one of Booker T. Washington. There are errors, including a statement that July 21, 1870, represented the "nineteenth" anniversary of Bull Run. These elements aside, the book's principal themes are an important reminder of Atlanta's role in defining the New South, and the quite different expectations and meanings that the era had for white and black Georgians. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate libraries and up. T. F. Armstrong Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.