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July 1914 : Countdown to War

By: McMeekin, Sean.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Basic Books, 2013Description: 1 online resource (481 p.).ISBN: 9780465056996.Subject(s): Europe -- History -- July Crisis, 1914 | World War, 1914-1918 -- CausesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: July 1914 : Countdown to WarDDC classification: 940.3/11 | 940.311 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Author's Note; Dramatis Personae; Chronology; Prologue: Sarajevo, Sunday, 28 June 1914; I. REACTIONS; 1. Vienna: Anger, Not Sympathy; 2. St. Petersburg: No Quarter Given; 3. Paris and London: Unwelcome Interruption; 4. Berlin: Sympathy and Impatience; II. COUNTDOWN; 5. The Count Hoyos Mission to Berlin; 6. War Council in Vienna (I); 7. Radio Silence; 8. Enter Sazonov; 9. War Council in Vienna (II); 10. Poincaré Meets the Tsar; 11. Sazonov's Threat; 12. Champagne Summit; 13. Anti-Ultimatum and Ultimatum; 14. Sazonov Strikes; 15. Russia, France, and Serbia Stand Firm
16. Russia Prepares for War17. The Kaiser Returns; 18. ""You Have Got Me into a Fine Mess""; 19. ""I Will not Be Responsible for a Monstrous Slaughter!""; 20. Slaughter It Is; 21. Last Chance Saloon; 22. ""Now You Can Do What You Want""; 23. Britain Wakes Up to the Danger; 24. Sir Edward Grey's Big Moment; 25. World War: No Going Back; Epilogue: The Question of Responsibility; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: When a Serbian-backed assassin gunned down Archduke Franz Ferdinand in late June 1914, the world seemed unmoved. Even Ferdinand's own uncle, Franz Josef I, was notably ambivalent about the death of the Hapsburg heir, saying simply, ?It is God's will." Certainly, there was nothing to suggest that the episode would lead to conflict?much less a world war of such massive and horrific proportions that it would fundamentally reshape the course of human events.As acclaimed historian Sean McMeekin reveals in July 1914, World War I might have been avoided entirely had it not been fo
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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D511 .M33 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1158992 Available EBL1158992
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D445 .B556 1990 Fascists and Conservatives : D445.C4 19 Challenges of Labour : D511 .D245 2004eb Decisions for War, 1914-1917. D511 .M33 2013 July 1914 : D520.S8 R66 1999eb Spain 1914-1918 : D520.T8 Crescent and Iron Cross. D521 The First World War.

Contents; Author's Note; Dramatis Personae; Chronology; Prologue: Sarajevo, Sunday, 28 June 1914; I. REACTIONS; 1. Vienna: Anger, Not Sympathy; 2. St. Petersburg: No Quarter Given; 3. Paris and London: Unwelcome Interruption; 4. Berlin: Sympathy and Impatience; II. COUNTDOWN; 5. The Count Hoyos Mission to Berlin; 6. War Council in Vienna (I); 7. Radio Silence; 8. Enter Sazonov; 9. War Council in Vienna (II); 10. Poincaré Meets the Tsar; 11. Sazonov's Threat; 12. Champagne Summit; 13. Anti-Ultimatum and Ultimatum; 14. Sazonov Strikes; 15. Russia, France, and Serbia Stand Firm

16. Russia Prepares for War17. The Kaiser Returns; 18. ""You Have Got Me into a Fine Mess""; 19. ""I Will not Be Responsible for a Monstrous Slaughter!""; 20. Slaughter It Is; 21. Last Chance Saloon; 22. ""Now You Can Do What You Want""; 23. Britain Wakes Up to the Danger; 24. Sir Edward Grey's Big Moment; 25. World War: No Going Back; Epilogue: The Question of Responsibility; Notes; Bibliography; Index

When a Serbian-backed assassin gunned down Archduke Franz Ferdinand in late June 1914, the world seemed unmoved. Even Ferdinand's own uncle, Franz Josef I, was notably ambivalent about the death of the Hapsburg heir, saying simply, ?It is God's will." Certainly, there was nothing to suggest that the episode would lead to conflict?much less a world war of such massive and horrific proportions that it would fundamentally reshape the course of human events.As acclaimed historian Sean McMeekin reveals in July 1914, World War I might have been avoided entirely had it not been fo

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

For over a generation, the study of the war plans of the Great Powers dominated the historiography on the origins of WW I, while human agency seemed to play only a secondary role. McMeekin (Koc Univ., Turkey) bases his narration on a close reading of the extant primary and secondary sources from the major players--Austria, Germany, France, Russia, and Britain--and returns human agency to the events that led to war. The result is a fascinating study of Austrian and German ham-handed diplomacy (bordering on cluelessness) combined with Russian and French duplicity, with a dose of British disengagement added for good measure. The author reorients understanding of the war's origins from an obsession with Germany's infamous Schlieffen Plan to an analysis that also considers the belligerent policies of France and Russia. While he does not exonerate German responsibility for the war, McMeekin details how Russia and France willfully lied to British diplomats about the timing of their mobilizations in order to ensure that Austria-Hungary and Germany were labeled the belligerents. Indeed, of all the continental great powers, Germany mobilized last, yet it was the first to violate Belgian neutrality. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. F. Krome University of Cincinnati--Clermont College

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