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The Blood of Guatemala : A History of Race and Nation

By: Grandin, Greg.
Contributor(s): Mignolo, Walter D | Saldívar-Hull, Sonia | Silverblatt, Irene.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Latin America Otherwise: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2000Description: 1 online resource (365 p.).ISBN: 9780822380337.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Blood of Guatemala : A History of Race and NationDDC classification: 972.81004/974152 LOC classification: F1465.2.Q5 | G736 2000Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Searching for the Living among the Dead; Prelude: A World Put Right, 31 March 1840; 1. The Greatest Indian City in the World: Caste, Gender, and Politics, 1750-1821; 2. Defending the Pueblo: Popular Protests and Elite Politics, 1786-1826; 3. A Pestilent Nationalism: The 1837 Cholera Epidemic Reconsidered; 4. A House with Two Masters: Carrera and the Restored Republic of Indians; 5. Principales to Patrones, Macehuales to Mozos: Land, Labor, and the Commodification of Community
6. Regenerating the Race: Race, Class, and the Nationalization of Ethnicity7. Time and Space among the Maya: Mayan Modernism and the Transformation of the City; 8. The Blood of Guatemalans: Class Struggle and the Death of K'iche ' Nationalism; Conclusions: The Limits of Nation, 1954-1999; Epilogue: The Living among the Dead; Appendix 1 Names and Places; Appendix 2 Glossary; Notes; Works cited; Index
Summary: A study of the political and cultural formation of one of Guatemala's indigenous communities that explores the nationalization of ethnicity, the preservation of Mayan identity, and the formation of a brutally repressive state.
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Contents; List of illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Searching for the Living among the Dead; Prelude: A World Put Right, 31 March 1840; 1. The Greatest Indian City in the World: Caste, Gender, and Politics, 1750-1821; 2. Defending the Pueblo: Popular Protests and Elite Politics, 1786-1826; 3. A Pestilent Nationalism: The 1837 Cholera Epidemic Reconsidered; 4. A House with Two Masters: Carrera and the Restored Republic of Indians; 5. Principales to Patrones, Macehuales to Mozos: Land, Labor, and the Commodification of Community

6. Regenerating the Race: Race, Class, and the Nationalization of Ethnicity7. Time and Space among the Maya: Mayan Modernism and the Transformation of the City; 8. The Blood of Guatemalans: Class Struggle and the Death of K'iche ' Nationalism; Conclusions: The Limits of Nation, 1954-1999; Epilogue: The Living among the Dead; Appendix 1 Names and Places; Appendix 2 Glossary; Notes; Works cited; Index

A study of the political and cultural formation of one of Guatemala's indigenous communities that explores the nationalization of ethnicity, the preservation of Mayan identity, and the formation of a brutally repressive state.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Many writings on Guatemala depict the Maya (approximately one half the population) as victims of the Hispanic (Ladino) ruling class. Focusing on the municipality of Quetzaltenango, Grandin demonstrates the shortcomings of such an oversimplified interpretation. In the early colonial period, the Spanish crown allowed native communities virtual autonomy under republicas de indios; in Quetzaltenango, political and social control were exercised by a K'iche' elite. Threatened by liberal political leaders of the early independence period, the Maya of Quetzaltenango supported the established church and conservative caudillo Jose Rafael Carrera. Following the late 19th century triumph of liberalism, the indigenous rulers readjusted their position and retained control over the rural Indian masses. The K'iche' elite promoted their own ethnic cultural heritage and economic and social interests. Their system was threatened, 1944-54, when presidents Arevalo and Arbenz advocated the assignment of land to rural Mayan families. Grandin contends that failure of those agrarian reforms--due in part to opposition by the national oligarchy, with US support, but also to opposition by the K'iche' elite--led to violent upheavals in Guatemala throughout much of the later 20th century. Grandin's work, though limited to one municipality, helps cut through many cliches and stereotypes of recent Guatemalan historiography. Upper-division undergraduate and graduate collections. E. H. Moseley; formerly, University of Alabama

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Greg Grandin is Assistant Professor of History at New York University. He worked with the Guatemalan Truth Commission in 1997-1998.</p>

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