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Modern Blackness : Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in Jamaica

By: Thomas, Deborah A.
Contributor(s): Mignolo, Walter D | Silverblatt, Irene | Saldívar-Hull, Sonia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Latin America Otherwise: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2004Description: 1 online resource (373 p.).ISBN: 9780822386308.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Modern Blackness : Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in JamaicaDDC classification: 972.92 LOC classification: F1874 | .T466 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
contents; acknowledgments; introduction ""Out of Many, One (Black) People""; PART I The Global-National; chapter 1 The ""Problem"" of Nationalism in the British West Indies; or, ""What We Are and What We Hope to Be""; chapter 2 Political Economies of Culture; PART II The National-Local; chapter 3 Strangers and Friends; chapter 4 Institutionalizing (Racialized) Progress; chapter 5 Emancipating the Nation (Again); PART III The Local-Global; chapter 6 Political Economies of Modernity; chapter 7 Modern Blackness; or, Theoretical ""Tripping"" on Black Vernacular Culture; conclusion The Remix
epiloguenotes; bibliography; index
Summary: An ethnographic study of cultural policy in Jamaica as seen from above and below in relation to race, class, and nation.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F1874 .T466 2004 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1168036 Available EBL1168036

contents; acknowledgments; introduction ""Out of Many, One (Black) People""; PART I The Global-National; chapter 1 The ""Problem"" of Nationalism in the British West Indies; or, ""What We Are and What We Hope to Be""; chapter 2 Political Economies of Culture; PART II The National-Local; chapter 3 Strangers and Friends; chapter 4 Institutionalizing (Racialized) Progress; chapter 5 Emancipating the Nation (Again); PART III The Local-Global; chapter 6 Political Economies of Modernity; chapter 7 Modern Blackness; or, Theoretical ""Tripping"" on Black Vernacular Culture; conclusion The Remix

epiloguenotes; bibliography; index

An ethnographic study of cultural policy in Jamaica as seen from above and below in relation to race, class, and nation.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anthropologist Thomas (Duke Univ.) interrogates the construction of an emerging Jamaicanness found in certain popular cultural practices and expressions--such as dance, food, music, language--as a "chosen" identity open to Jamaicans everywhere, at home and especially in the diaspora created by massive and continuous out-migration. In this option, being Jamaican is not dependent on one's color or class; it is dynamic and flexible, de-links culture with territory, and raises questions about authenticity and ownership. Thomas argues that this racialized version of citizenship, which she terms "modern Blackness," is an alternative space created to contest the static, postindependent official ideal of a "respectable" creole, multicultural, national identity that was constructed by selecting in various "folk" practices from the country's African heritage while simultaneously selecting out others associated with the growing urban poor and unemployed. In other words, "modern Blackness" is a political project where identity and belonging for a neocolonial, diasporic people cannot be sufficiently explained by examining the usual intersections among race, class, gender, and sexuality within a national framework. In Thomas's brilliant multisited research and multilayered analysis, the political economy of development--specifically, neoliberal capitalist globalization--is critical in understanding the politics of Jamaican culture and identity. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. Hu-DeHart Brown University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Deborah A. Thomas is Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University.</p>

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