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A Flock Divided : Race, Religion, and Politics in Mexico, 1749-1857

By: O'Hara, Matthew D.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (334 p.).ISBN: 9780822392491.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Flock Divided : Race, Religion, and Politics in Mexico, 1749–1857Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction - The Children of Rebekah; Part I - Institutions and Ideas; One - Geographies of Buildings, Bodies, and Souls; Two - An Eighteenth-Century Great Debate; Part II - Reform and Reaction; Three - Stone, Mortar, and Memory; Four - Invisible Religion; Part III - Piety and Politics; Five - Spiritual Capital; Six - Miserables and Citizens; Conclusion - The Struggle of Jacob and Esau; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: A history examining the interactions between church authorities and Mexican parishioners-from the late-colonial era into the early-national period-shows how religious thought and practice shaped Mexico s popular politics.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F1392.A1 O337 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1171694 Available EBL1171694
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
F1386.9.B55 B46 2003eb Africans in Colonial Mexico : F1391.O12 G837 2005 The Time of Liberty : F1392.A1 K389 2009 Race and Classification : F1392.A1 O337 2009 A Flock Divided : F1392.A5H37 2002eb Empire and Revolution : F1392.A5S37 2008 Cold War Exiles in Mexico : F1392.B55 Colonial Blackness :

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction - The Children of Rebekah; Part I - Institutions and Ideas; One - Geographies of Buildings, Bodies, and Souls; Two - An Eighteenth-Century Great Debate; Part II - Reform and Reaction; Three - Stone, Mortar, and Memory; Four - Invisible Religion; Part III - Piety and Politics; Five - Spiritual Capital; Six - Miserables and Citizens; Conclusion - The Struggle of Jacob and Esau; Notes; Bibliography; Index

A history examining the interactions between church authorities and Mexican parishioners-from the late-colonial era into the early-national period-shows how religious thought and practice shaped Mexico s popular politics.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Focusing on the period from the Bourbon Reforms to La Reforma, O'Hara (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz) uses "religious ideas and practices, especially those based on the colonial category of Indian" to investigate issues of continuity and change in Mexican society. In a century marked by great changes imposed on local parishes by clerical and secular authority, he finds popular acceptance of these reforms to be inconsistent, the process uneven, and the resulting changes incomplete. The groups affected brokered local acceptance of imposed modernization, but they often vigorously resisted some or all of the imposed changes. As late as the mid-19th century, disputes over control of religious objects and ritual manifested holdovers from, and even retreats back to, concepts and practices from the colonial past. Both the clergy and the faithful invoked colonial religious concepts and traditional rights to bolster their positions in these contestations. The work rests on an extensive base of sources from Mexican and Spanish archives, published documents, and secondary works on religious culture and Mexican colonial society. Summing Up: Recommended. Of particular interest to graduate students and specialists in the field. V. H. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Matthew D. O'Hara is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz.</p>

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