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Southern Black Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement [electronic resource].

By: Pitre, Merline.
Contributor(s): Myrick-Harris, Clarissa | Frear, Yvonne Davis | Goldstone, Dwonna Naomi | Emmons, Caroline | Dulaney, Marvin W | Whayne, Jeannie M | Frystak, Shannon L | Jones, Maxine D | Lovett, Bobby L | Decker, Stefanie | Morris, Tiyi M.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (437 p.).ISBN: 9781603449991.Subject(s): African American women -- Civil rights -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | African American women civil rights workers -- Southern States -- Biography | African American women civil rights workers -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- United States | Civil rights workers -- Southern States -- Biography | Southern States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Southern States -- Social conditions -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Southern Black Women in the Modern Civil Rights MovementDDC classification: 323.1196073075 LOC classification: E185.92 .S682 2013Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Contributions of African American Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement; Part I: Professional and Organizational Leaders; 1. "A Tremendous Job To Be Done": African American Women in the Virginia Civil Rights Movement; 2. Making the Invisible Visible: African American Women in the Texas Civil Rights Movement; 3. Black Women in the Arkansas Civil Rights Movement; Part II: Bridge Leaders and Foot Soldiers in the Deep South; 4. Black Women in the Florida Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 5. Black Women in Alabama, 1954-1974
6. "Call the Women": The Tradition of African American Female Activism in Georgia during the Civil Rights Movement7. Women in the South Carolina Civil Rights Movement; 8. Black Women Activists in Mississippi during the Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 9. Black Women in the North Carolina Civil Rights Movement; 10. Southern Black Women in the Louisiana Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 11. African American Women in the Tennessee Civil Rights Movement; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index; Back Cover
Summary: Throughout the South, black women were crucial to the Civil Rights Movement, serving as grassroots and organizational leaders. They protested, participated, sat in, mobilized, created, energized, led particular efforts, and served as bridge builders to the rest of the community. Ignored at the time by white politicians and the media alike, with few exceptions they worked behind the scenes to effect the changes all in the movement sought. Until relatively recently, historians, too, have largely ignored their efforts. Although African American women mobilized all across Dixie, their particular strategies took different forms in different states, just as the opposition they faced from white segregationists took different shapes. Studies of what happened at the state and local levels are critical not only because of what black women accomplished, but also because their activism, leadership, and courage demonstrated the militancy needed for a mass movement. In this volume, scholars address similarities and variations by providing case studies of the individual states during the 1950s and 1960s, laying the groundwork for more synthetic analyses of the circumstances, factors, and strategies used by black women in the former Confederate states to destroy the system of segregation in this country.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.92 .S682 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1180044 Available EBL1180044

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Contributions of African American Women in the Modern Civil Rights Movement; Part I: Professional and Organizational Leaders; 1. "A Tremendous Job To Be Done": African American Women in the Virginia Civil Rights Movement; 2. Making the Invisible Visible: African American Women in the Texas Civil Rights Movement; 3. Black Women in the Arkansas Civil Rights Movement; Part II: Bridge Leaders and Foot Soldiers in the Deep South; 4. Black Women in the Florida Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 5. Black Women in Alabama, 1954-1974

6. "Call the Women": The Tradition of African American Female Activism in Georgia during the Civil Rights Movement7. Women in the South Carolina Civil Rights Movement; 8. Black Women Activists in Mississippi during the Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 9. Black Women in the North Carolina Civil Rights Movement; 10. Southern Black Women in the Louisiana Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974; 11. African American Women in the Tennessee Civil Rights Movement; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index; Back Cover

Throughout the South, black women were crucial to the Civil Rights Movement, serving as grassroots and organizational leaders. They protested, participated, sat in, mobilized, created, energized, led particular efforts, and served as bridge builders to the rest of the community. Ignored at the time by white politicians and the media alike, with few exceptions they worked behind the scenes to effect the changes all in the movement sought. Until relatively recently, historians, too, have largely ignored their efforts. Although African American women mobilized all across Dixie, their particular strategies took different forms in different states, just as the opposition they faced from white segregationists took different shapes. Studies of what happened at the state and local levels are critical not only because of what black women accomplished, but also because their activism, leadership, and courage demonstrated the militancy needed for a mass movement. In this volume, scholars address similarities and variations by providing case studies of the individual states during the 1950s and 1960s, laying the groundwork for more synthetic analyses of the circumstances, factors, and strategies used by black women in the former Confederate states to destroy the system of segregation in this country.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This collection contributes to the growing scholarship on the role of women in the civil rights movement by bringing together essays on women's activism in 11 southern states. The first part of the book, "Professional and Organizational Leaders," focuses on key individuals who worked with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to dismantle Jim Crow in Virginia, Texas, and Arkansas. Part 2, "Bridge Leaders and Foot Soldiers in the Deep South," highlights women's grassroots activism in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Tennessee, where they worked to combat segregation and discrimination in education, employment, housing, transportation, public facilities, and voting. Collectively, these essays reveal much about the breadth of women's activism, as well as the ways in which it varied by location--a comparative focus that is particularly noteworthy and useful. Summing Up: Recommended. General and undergraduate collections and above. L. M. Puaca Christopher Newport University

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